Weak pocket pairs

Pztrick44

Pztrick44

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Any advice on how to play these?


Typically, if I get any pp from 22 through 88, I'll limp to the flop(fold against any raises preflop). If I don't hit a set, I'll get away from the hand... If I hit a set, I will check/raise, or raise if I'm the button.
If it's a rainbow flop: I'll check/raise a little bit. If someone raises, I may just call and check/raise the turn and river, too... figuring it's likely their hands will not improve against mine. Slowplay, and hopefully someone else will catch something so that I can stack them.
If there's a possible straight or flush draw on the flop: Right now, I play mostly the same.. but I've had to fold frequently, when I have to worry about a straight or flush when the turn may improve the hand(ex: im 77, and flop comes out 7h,2h,Ac, I check/call a weak minimum bet, and the turn gives another heart--allowing a flush for somebody! Villain might raise 5BB or something here, so I fold..) I probably need to start betting more on the flop, even if it means taking down smaller pots--I mean, if I bet 5BB on the flop, everyone may fold, but if I slowplay and that straight or flush card doesn't come, I can earn some $$ from people drawing out against me, but also possibly having to fold when somebody hits their straight or flush.

So, I'll keep slowplaying the rainbow flops when I hit a set---but should I bet big when I hit my set with straight/flush-possible flops(damn, is there shorthand for this kind of flop? lol), or play like I do now and let people pay when they draw out against me?

edit: hmm, i should probably have posted this in the Poker Strategies forum. :O
 
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shinedown.45

shinedown.45

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when there is any kind of draw out there when you hit your set, you definitely have to bet enough to give improper odds for any players drawing.
 
Bombjack

Bombjack

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You should be raising up your pocket pairs from late position. Playing full ring, unless the table is really passive, there's nothing wrong with folding the baby pairs (66 and below) from early position, because it's going to be more difficult to extract value when you hit, and more difficult to make positional bluffs when you miss.

Check-raising is generally a weak play while at the same time letting everyone know that you have a strong hand, and you should be the one taking the lead in the betting.

Slowplaying is also pretty much a beginner's mistake except when there's a really good reason to do so - e.g. you don't think anyone has much of a hand and can't call a raise, or you think you'll be able to keep other people in the pot and call the bet if you just call as well. Usually it's better to play it fast, especially if you think you're up against a big pair. Often a scare card will come and kill your action even if it doesn't make someone else a better hand.
 
T

Threads13

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FWIW, it sounds like you are trying to cookbook this a little bit. I would suggest looking at these as individual situations with the same goal. If you want to use the macro view remember that you want to build a big pot so you should tend to make big bets.

Also, I think you can often call raises if you think it will be profitable to do so. I don't think it is auto-muck or anything.
 
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evny

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are you playing 6max or FR?... if 6max i pretty much raise up all opens w PP's
 
OzExorcist

OzExorcist

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If there's a possible straight or flush draw on the flop: Right now, I play mostly the same.. but I've had to fold frequently, when I have to worry about a straight or flush when the turn may improve the hand(ex: im 77, and flop comes out 7h,2h,Ac, I check/call a weak minimum bet, and the turn gives another heart--allowing a flush for somebody! Villain might raise 5BB or something here, so I fold..)

Someone mentioned the same thing a couple of days ago about sets and straight / flush draws and it probably bears repeating. Think about this:

- If your opponent has four to the flush on the flop, they have 9 outs (about 35%)
- If you've flopped a set, you have 7 outs to a full house or quads (about 28%), and you pick up another 3 if the board doesn't pair on the turn (about 22% for the river)

Sure, you have to reevaluate your position on the turn and the river, but a flush draw against your set on the flop is a long way from an autofold if you get raised
 
Pztrick44

Pztrick44

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Someone mentioned the same thing a couple of days ago about sets and straight / flush draws and it probably bears repeating. Think about this:

- If your opponent has four to the flush on the flop, they have 9 outs (about 35%)
- If you've flopped a set, you have 7 outs to a full house or quads (about 28%), and you pick up another 3 if the board doesn't pair on the turn (about 22% for the river)

Sure, you have to reevaluate your position on the turn and the river, but a flush draw against your set on the flop is a long way from an autofold if you get raised

Hmm, some extra implied odds, too... if the board pairs making their flush and your fullhouse, they may make the mistake of not putting you on the fullhouse and you can stack them easy.
 
OzExorcist

OzExorcist

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That's the idea.

Keep in mind that this is only the case for a flush draw, not a made flush. If you think you're up against a made flush (or straight, for that matter)... I guess your action depends how much you like putting your money in while you're behind.

The odds are slightly better (about 32% vs your 28% on the flop) against an open-end straight draw and much better (about 17% vs your 28% on the flop) against a gutshot straight draw.
 
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