Your Guide To The 2022 World Series Of Poker

The WSOP - Schedule of Tournaments, Buy-in & Satellite Information. This page covers everything you need to know about the 2022 World Series of Poker, including the up-to-date schedule, information on how to enter and answers to FAQs.

WSOP image

Remember, there's more to the world's biggest poker series than just the Main Event. Our WSOP tournament schedule below features every event for 2022 and all the important information you need to know.

WSOP Schedule 2022

The 2022 World Series of Poker runs from Tuesday May 31 through July 20 at Bally's Las Vegas Hotel & Casino and Paris Las Vegas.
# Event Title Date Duration Buy-In
#1 Event Title Casino Employees No-Limit Hold'em Date Tue, May 31st 11:00 AM Duration2 Days Buy-In$500
#2 Event Title High Roller Bounty No-Limit Hold’em Date Tue, May 31st 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$100,000
#3 Event Title Freezeout No-Limit Hold'em Date Wed, Jun 1st 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$2,500
#4 Event Title Dealers Choice 6-Handed Date Wed, Jun 1st 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#5A Event Title The Housewarming No-limit Hold'em – Flight A Date Thu, Jun 2nd 10:00 AM Duration6 Days Buy-In$500
#6 Event Title Heads Up No-Limit Hold'em Championship Date Thu, Jun 2nd 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$25,000
#5B Event Title The Housewarming No-limit Hold'em – Flight B Date Fri, Jun 3rd 10:00 AM Duration6 Days Buy-In$500
#7 Event Title Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Date Fri, Jun 3rd 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#5C Event Title The Housewarming No-limit Hold'em – Flight C Date Sat, Jun 4th 10:00 AM Duration6 Days Buy-In$500
#8 Event Title High Roller No-Limit Hold’em 8-Handed Date Sat, Jun 4th 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$25,000
#9 Event Title Seven Card Stud Date Sat, Jun 4th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#5D Event Title The Housewarming No-limit Hold'em $5,000,000 Guaranteed Prize Pool – Flight D Date Sun, Jun 5th 10:00 AM Duration6 Days Buy-In$500
#10 Event Title Dealers Choice 6-Handed Championship Date Sun, Jun 5th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#11 Event Title No-Limit Hold’em Deepstack Date Mon, Jun 6th 11:00 AM Duration2 Days Buy-In$600
#12 Event Title High Roller No-Limit Hold'em 8-Handed Date Mon, Jun 6th 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$50,000
#13 Event Title Limit Hold’em Date Mon, Jun 6th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#14 Event Title 6-Handed No-Limit Hold’em Date Tue, Jun 7th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#15 Event Title Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship Date Tue, Jun 7th 3:00 PM Duration4 Days Buy-In$10,000
#16 Event Title No-Limit Hold’em Date Wed, Jun 8th 11:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$3,000
#17 Event Title Mixed Triple Draw Lowball (Limit) Date Wed, Jun 8th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$2,500
#18 Event Title Freezeout No-Limit Hold’em Date Thu, Jun 9th 11:00 AM Duration2 Days Buy-In$1,000
#19 Event Title High Roller Pot-Limit Omaha (8-Handed) Date Thu, Jun 9th 1:00 PM Duration4 Days Buy-In$25,000
#20 Event Title Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Date Thu, Jun 9th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#21A Event Title MONSTER STACK No-Limit Hold'em – Flight A Date Fri, Jun 10th 10:00 AM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,500
#22 Event Title Seven Card Stud Championship Date Fri, Jun 10th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#21B Event Title MONSTER STACK No-Limit Hold'em – Flight B Date Sat, Jun 11th 10:00 AM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,500
#23 Event Title 6-Handed Limit Hold’em Date Sat, Jun 11th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$3,000
#24 Event Title FLIP & GO No-Limit Hold’em Presented by GG Poker – Flight A Date Sun, Jun 12th 11:00 AM Duration2 Days Buy-In$1,000
#25 Event Title No-Limit Hold’em Deepstack Date Sun, Jun 12th 1:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$800
#26 Event Title Limit Hold'em Championship Date Sun, Jun 12th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#27 Event Title SHOOTOUT No-Limit Hold'em Date Mon, Jun 13th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#28 Event Title HIGH ROLLER Pot-Limit Omaha Date Mon, Jun 13th 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$50,000
#29 Event Title No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Date Mon, Jun 13th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#30 Event Title Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed Date Tue, Jun 14th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,000
#31 Event Title Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple Draw Championship Date Tue, Jun 14th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#32 Event Title H.O.R.S.E. Date Wed, Jun 15th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#33 Event Title 6-Handed No-Limit Hold’em Date Wed, Jun 15th 3:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$3,000
#34 Event Title Freezeout No-Limit Hold’em Date Thu, Jun 16th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#35 Event Title Mixed Big Bet Event Date Thu, Jun 16th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$2,500
#36 Event Title Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Date Fri, Jun 16th 10:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#37A Event Title MILLIONAIRE MAKER No-Limit Hold’em – Flight A Date Fri, Jun 17th 10:00 AM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,500
#38 Event Title No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw Championship Date Fri, Jun 17th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#37B Event Title MILLIONAIRE MAKER No-Limit Hold’em – Flight B Date Sat, Jun 18th 10:00 AM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,500
#39 Event Title 6-Handed Pot-Limit Omaha Date Sat, Jun 18th 1:00 PM Duration4 Days Buy-In$3,000
#40 Event Title Seven Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship Date Sat, Jun 18th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#41 Event Title Super Turbo Bounty No-Limit Hold'em (freezeout) Date Sun, Jun 19th 11:00 AM Duration1 Day Buy-In$1,000
#42 Event Title High Roller No-Limit Hold’em Date Sun, Jun 19th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$100,000
#43 Event Title Freezeout No-Limit Hold’em Date Mon, Jun 20th 11:00 AM Duration2 Days Buy-In$500
#44 Event Title H.O.R.S.E. Championship Date Mon, Jun 20th 3:00 PM Duration4 Days Buy-In$10,000
#45 Event Title Pot-Limit Omaha (8-Handed) Date Tue, Jun 21st 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#46 Event Title 6-Handed No-Limit Hold’em Date Tue, Jun 21st 11:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$5,000
#47A Event Title SENIORS No-Limit Hold’em Championship – Flight A Date Wed, Jun 22nd 10:00 AM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,000
#48 Event Title Eight Game Mix 6-Handed Date Wed, Jun 22nd 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#47B Event Title SENIORS No-Limit Hold’em Championship – Flight B Date Thu, Jun 23rd 10:00 AM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,000
#49 Event Title No-Limit Hold’em Date Thu, Jun 23rd 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$2,000
#50 Event Title Super High Roller No-Limit Hold'em Date Thu, Jun 23rd 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$250,000
#51A Event Title COLOSSUS No-Limit Hold’em – Flight A Date Fri, Jun 24th 10:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$400
#52 Event Title Nine Game Mix 6-Handed Date Fri, Jun 24th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$2,500
#51B Event Title COLOSSUS No-Limit Hold’em – Flight B Date Sat, Jun 25th 10:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$400
#53 Event Title Mixed No-Limit Hold'em; Pot-Limit Omaha (8-Handed) Date Sat, Jun 25th 3:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$5,000
#54 Event Title SALUTE to Warriors - No-Limit Hold’em Date Sun, Jun 26th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$500
#55 Event Title TAG TEAM No-Limit Hold'em Date Sun, Jun 26th 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,000
#56 Event Title Poker Players Championship 6-Handed Date Sun, Jun 26th 3:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$50,000
#57 Event Title Deepstack Championship No-Limit Hold'em Date Mon, Jun 27th 11:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$600
#58 Event Title Pot-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better (8-Handed) Date Mon, Jun 27th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#59 Event Title SUPER SENIORS No-Limit Hold’em Date Tue, Jun 28th 11:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$1,000
#60 Event Title Short Deck No-Limit Hold'em Date Tue, Jun 28th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#61 Event Title LADIES No-Limit Hold’em Championship Date Wed, Jun 29th 11:00 AM Duration4 Days Buy-In$1,000
#62 Event Title Super Turbo Bounty No-Limit Hold'em (freezeout) Date Wed, Jun 29th 1:00 PM Duration1 Day Buy-In$1,500
#63 Event Title Pot-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better Championship (8-Handed) Date Wed, Jun 29th 3:00 PM Duration4 Days Buy-In$10,000
#64 Event Title Pot-Limit Omaha Deepstack (8-Handed) Date Thu, Jun 30th 11:00 AM Duration2 Days Buy-In$600
#65 Event Title Freezeout No-Limit Hold'em Date Thu, Jun 30th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$3,000
#66 Event Title MINI Main Event No-Limit Hold’em (freezeout) Date Fri, Jul 1st 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,000
#67 Event Title Super Turbo Bounty No-Limit Hold'em (freezeout) Date Fri, Jul 1st 3:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$10,000
#68A Event Title Million Dollar Bounty No-Limit Hold'em – Flight A Date Sat, Jul 2nd 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,000
#69 Event Title Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed Championship Date Sat, Jul 2nd 3:00 PM Duration4 Days Buy-In$10,000
#70A Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 1A Date Sun, Jul 3rd 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In$10,000
#68B Event Title Million Dollar Bounty No-Limit Hold'em – Flight B Date Sun, Jul 3rd 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,000
#70B Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 1B Date Mon, Jul 4th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In$10,000
#68C Event Title Million Dollar Bounty No-Limit Hold'em – Flight C Date Mon, Jul 4th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,000
#68D Event Title Million Dollar Bounty No-Limit Hold'em – Flight D Date Mon, Jul 4th 7:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,000
#70C Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 1C Date Tue, Jul 5th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In$10,000
#70D Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 1D Date Wed, Jul 6th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In$10,000
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 2AB Date Thu, Jul 7th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#71A Event Title One More for One Drop No-Limit Hold'em – Flight A Date Thu, Jul 7th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,111
#72 Event Title Mixed: Pot-Limit Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better; Omaha Hi Lo 8 or Better; 'Big O' Date Thu, Jul 7th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 2CD Date Fri, Jul 8th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#71B Event Title One More for One Drop No-Limit Hold'em – Flight B Date Fri, Jul 8th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,111
#73 Event Title Razz Date Fri, Jul 8th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 3 Date Sat, Jul 9th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#71C Event Title One More for One Drop No-Limit Hold'em – Flight C Date Sat, Jul 9th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$1,111
#74 Event Title BOUNTY Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed Date Sat, Jul 9th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 4 Date Sun, Jul 10th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#75A Event Title Lucky 7's No-Limit Hold'em 7-Handed – Flight A Date Sun, Jul 10th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$777
#76 Event Title Poker Hall of Fame Bounty No-Limit Hold'em (freezeout) Date Sun, Jul 10th 3:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$1,979
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 5 Date Mon, Jul 11th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#75B Event Title Lucky 7's No-Limit Hold'em 7-Handed – Flight B Date Mon, Jul 11th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$777
#77 Event Title Mixed No-Limit Hold'em; Pot-Limit Omaha (8-Handed) Date Mon, Jul 11th 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#78 Event Title No-Limit Hold'em Date Mon, Jul 11th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$2,500
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Day 6 Date Tue, Jul 12th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#75C Event Title Lucky 7's No-Limit Hold'em 7-Handed – Flight C Date Tue, Jul 12th 12:00 PM Duration5 Days Buy-In$777
#79 Event Title Razz Championship Date Tue, Jul 12th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Plays down to 9 players Date Wed, Jul 13th 11:00 AM Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#80 Event Title Mixed No-Limit Hold'em; Pot-Limit Omaha Deepstack (8-Handed) Date Wed, Jul 13th 12:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$600
#81 Event Title Freezeout No-Limit Hold’em 8-Handed Date Wed, Jul 13th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$5,000
#82 Event Title 8-Handed No-Limit Hold’em Deepstack Date Thu, Jul 14th 12:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$800
#83 Event Title HIGH ROLLER No-Limit Hold’em Date Thu, Jul 14th 1:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$50,000
#84 Event Title H.O.R.S.E. Date Thu, Jul 14th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$3,000
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Final Table Date Fri, Jul 15th TBD Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#85A Event Title The Closer - No-Limit Hold’em – Flight A Date Fri, Jul 15th 12:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#86 Event Title 6-Handed No-Limit Hold'em Championship Date Fri, Jul 15th 3:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$10,000
#70 Event Title MAIN EVENT No-Limit Hold'em World Championship – Final Table Date Sat, Jul 16th TBD Duration14 Days Buy-In-
#85B Event Title The Closer - No-Limit Hold’em – Flight B Date Sat, Jul 16th 12:00 PM Duration3 Days Buy-In$1,500
#87 Event Title 8-Handed No-Limit Hold'em Date Sat, Jul 16th 3:00 PM Duration2 Days Buy-In$5,000
#88 Event Title Super Turbo No-Limit Hold'em Date Sun, Jul 17th 11:00 AM Duration1 Day Buy-In$1,000
#89 Event Title Tournament of Champions – Day 1 Date Mon, Jul 18th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In$0
#89 Event Title Tournament of Champions – Day 2 Date Tue, Jul 19th 11:00 AM Duration3 Days Buy-In-
#89 Event Title Tournament of Champions – Day 3 Date Wed, Jul 20th TBD Duration3 Days Buy-In-
load more

How To Enter the 2022 WSOP

Anyone over the age of 21 can enter the World Series of Poker! See below to find out how.

Enter online WSOP Satellites

By winning a series of online tournaments, or even a single satellite tournament, you can make your way to Las Vegas for next to nothing.

With some buy-ins starting from as low as $2, you’ll normally have to advance through three or four stages before claiming a WSOP seat.

Alternatively, you can buy-in for a greater amount at a later stage of the qualifying tournament.

Sites hosting online satellites include WSOP.com and GG Poker (non-US).

Note: Main Event entry is often received in cash, it is your responsibility to buy into the Main Event.

Enter a local WSOP Satellite

Poker rooms and land-based casinos all over America, Canada and even Europe will be teaming up with WSOP to host local qualifying events.

These qualifying tournaments will likely take longer and have higher buy-ins than online satellites – but are still a viable option for players looking to grab a seat at the WSOP.

Direct buy-In

Don't want to play your way to Vegas? Got $10,000 lying around? Bring it to Vegas and buy directly in to the WSOP 2022 Main Event. Saving yourself from burnout and tiredness so that you've got a clear mind when it comes to showtime.

Qualify in Vegas

Short on funds this year? No fear, you can enter a live satellite in Las Vegas.

The WSOP hosts daily tournaments with buy-ins that come in way under the $10,000 Main Event cost. Players earn tournament chips that can be used in any of the WSOP 2022 gold bracelet tournaments.

Practice for the World Series of Poker

1
US flag
4.90/5

Payment Methods

Top US Poker Sites

Rank
Top US poker sites
Game Type
Best for
Deposit Methods and Compatibility
1
4.90/5
Play Now
Poker
Top Pick
  •  
Ratings are determined by the CardsChat editorial team. This team carries out a strict auditing process when reviewing sites, assessing payout speed, game variety, software quality, level of security, mobile compatibility, and customer service.
Find out more about the CardsChat team
2
4.74/5
Play Now
Casino
Great Software
  •  
Ratings are determined by the CardsChat editorial team. This team carries out a strict auditing process when reviewing sites, assessing payout speed, game variety, software quality, level of security, mobile compatibility, and customer service.
Find out more about the CardsChat team
3
4.54/5
Play Now
Casino
Excellent Slots
  •  
Ratings are determined by the CardsChat editorial team. This team carries out a strict auditing process when reviewing sites, assessing payout speed, game variety, software quality, level of security, mobile compatibility, and customer service.
Find out more about the CardsChat team
4
4.35/5
Play Now
Poker
Mobile Friendly
  •  
Read Review
Ratings are determined by the CardsChat editorial team. This team carries out a strict auditing process when reviewing sites, assessing payout speed, game variety, software quality, level of security, mobile compatibility, and customer service.
Find out more about the CardsChat team
5
4.15/5
Play Now
Casino
Secure
Read Review
Ratings are determined by the CardsChat editorial team. This team carries out a strict auditing process when reviewing sites, assessing payout speed, game variety, software quality, level of security, mobile compatibility, and customer service.
Find out more about the CardsChat team

Who has won the World Series of Poker?

Koray Aldemir
$8,000,000
2021
Koray Aldemir

Following WSOP 2020, which featured an altered format due to the COVID-19 pandemic, WSOP 2021 saw the tournament return to normal with a full schedule of 88 live events, plus a further 11 online events.

Read more
Koray Aldemir
Close log in popup

Following WSOP 2020, which featured an altered format due to the COVID-19 pandemic, WSOP 2021 saw the tournament return to normal with a full schedule of 88 live events, plus a further 11 online events.

German Koray Aldemir was the Main Event winner, beating George Holmes at the final table to take the $8,000,000 first prize.

A virtual unknown prior to the tournament, finalist Holmes was dubbed a “Home Game Hero” by many, as the father of two from Alpharetta, Georgia was mainly a recreational player prior to entering.

2nd place:
George Holmes
3rd place:
Jack Oliver
# of players:
6,650
prize pool:
$62,011,250
Damian Salas
$2,550,969
2020
Damian Salas

Originally scheduled to begin on May 26th at Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, WSOP 2020 was initially postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In June, WSOP launched the 2020 World Series of Poker Online, hosted between WSOP.com and GGPoker, which started in July and finished in September – with Stoyan Madanzhiev the overall winner.

Read more
Damian Salas
Close log in popup

Originally scheduled to begin on May 26th at Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, WSOP 2020 was initially postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In June, WSOP launched the 2020 World Series of Poker Online, hosted between WSOP.com and GGPoker, which started in July and finished in September – with Stoyan Madanzhiev the overall winner.

The following November it was then announced the $10,000 No Limit Hold'em Main Event would still be held – with play beginning online in November for international players and December for American players.

Once both tournaments reached the final nine players, final tables were held live in the Czech Republic for international players, and at the Rio for American players.

The winners of both final tables, Damian Salas and Joseph Hebert, then met in a heads-up match at the Rio on January 3rd to determine the champion – with Salas winning.

2nd place:
Brunno Botteon
3rd place:
Manuel Ruivo
# of players:
1,379 (GG Poker and WSOP.com combined)
prize pool:
GG Poker $6,470,400
WSOP.com $6,768,000
Hossein Ensan
$10,000,000
2019
Hossein Ensan

The winner of the 2019 WSOP Main Event was Iranian-German poker player Hossein Ensan, who won a staggering $10,000,000. That's $1,200,000 more than John Cynn won the previous year, and the most Ensan has ever won by over $9,000,000. Ensan eliminated runner-up Dario Sammartino after a four-hour Heads-up play which lasted 101 hands. The final hand that led him to victory was a pair of kings. This was the largest WSOP Main Event since 2006, and the second largest of all time, with 8,569 players.

Read more
Hossein Ensan
Close log in popup

The winner of the 2019 WSOP Main Event was Iranian-German poker player Hossein Ensan, who won a staggering $10,000,000. That's $1,200,000 more than John Cynn won the previous year, and the most Ensan has ever won by over $9,000,000. Ensan eliminated runner-up Dario Sammartino after a four-hour Heads-up play which lasted 101 hands. The final hand that led him to victory was a pair of kings. This was the largest WSOP Main Event since 2006, and the second largest of all time, with 8,569 players.

2nd place:
Dario Sammartino
3rd place:
Alex Livingston
# of players:
8,569
prize pool:
$80,548,600
John Cynn
$8,880,000
2018
John Cynn

After a battle that lasted over 10 hours, John Cynn was declared the winner of the 2018 WSOP Main Event, beating Tony Miles to the coveted title. Scooping up the $8.8 million prize money, it was clear that it had been a game for the ages, with multiple records set during the event. Having entered the tournament with career earnings of under $1 million, it's safe to say that Cynn has really stepped up his game.

Read more
John Cynn
Close log in popup

After a battle that lasted over 10 hours, John Cynn was declared the winner of the 2018 WSOP Main Event, beating Tony Miles to the coveted title. Scooping up the $8.8 million prize money, it was clear that it had been a game for the ages, with multiple records set during the event. Having entered the tournament with career earnings of under $1 million, it's safe to say that Cynn has really stepped up his game.

2nd place:
Tony Miles
3rd place:
Michael Dyer
# of players:
7,874
prize pool:
$74,015,600
Scott Blumenstein
$8,150,000
2017
Scott Blumenstein

Hailing from Brigantine, New Jersey, Scott Blumstein took this year's WSOP Main Event bracelet. This win saw Blumstein take home a huge $8,150,000, almost a whole 150K more than last year, after beating a staggering 7,221 players to the prize pool. Blumstein's win was one for the underdogs, similarly unknown like the 2016 winner. Overall, 1,084 players took home winnings from the Main Event.

Read more
Scott Blumenstein
Close log in popup

Hailing from Brigantine, New Jersey, Scott Blumstein took this year's WSOP Main Event bracelet. This win saw Blumstein take home a huge $8,150,000, almost a whole 150K more than last year, after beating a staggering 7,221 players to the prize pool. Blumstein's win was one for the underdogs, similarly unknown like the 2016 winner. Overall, 1,084 players took home winnings from the Main Event.

2nd place:
Dan Ott
3rd place:
Benjamin Pollak
# of players:
7,221
prize pool:
$67,877,400
Qui Nguyen
$8,005,310
2016
Qui Nguyen

The 2016 World Series of Poker saw Qui place number one spot from a potential 6,737 players, a few hundred more than the previous year. Nguyen won the Main Event by heads-up against Gordon Vayo on the final table and walked away with $8,005,310. The top 1,011 players finished in the money this year and saw Vayo take second place with Cliff Josephy coming in third.

Read more
Qui Nguyen
Close log in popup

The 2016 World Series of Poker saw Qui place number one spot from a potential 6,737 players, a few hundred more than the previous year. Nguyen won the Main Event by heads-up against Gordon Vayo on the final table and walked away with $8,005,310. The top 1,011 players finished in the money this year and saw Vayo take second place with Cliff Josephy coming in third.

2nd place:
Gordon Vayo
3rd place:
Cliff Josephy
# of players:
6,737
prize pool:
$63,327,800
Joe Mckeehen
$7,683,346
2015
Joe Mckeehen

The 46th annual WSOP event took place in 2015, and it was held at Vegas's famous Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino (just like all the WSOP tournaments in the past 9 years). The event drew 6,420 players, creating a prize pool of a whopping $60,348,000. The top 1,000 players won some money, with all the final table players bringing home at least $1 million each. Joe McKeehen, the first-place winner, won $7,683,346. The second-place winner was Joshua Beckley and he won $4,470,896.

Read more
Joe Mckeehen
Close log in popup

The 46th annual WSOP event took place in 2015, and it was held at Vegas's famous Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino (just like all the WSOP tournaments in the past 9 years). The event drew 6,420 players, creating a prize pool of a whopping $60,348,000. The top 1,000 players won some money, with all the final table players bringing home at least $1 million each. Joe McKeehen, the first-place winner, won $7,683,346. The second-place winner was Joshua Beckley and he won $4,470,896.

2nd place:
Joshua Beckley
3rd place:
Neil Blumenfield
# of players:
6,420
prize pool:
$60,348,000
Martin Jacobson
$10,000,000
2014
Martin Jacobson

Once again held at Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the 2014 WSOP tournament had 6,683 entrants and a prize pool of $62,820,200. The first person who got out at the final table (also known as the ninth-place winner) was Mark Newhouse, and he brought home $730,725. The second-place winner was Felix Stephensen, and he brought home $5,147,911. Martin Jacobson placed first and brought home a cool $10 million.

Read more
Martin Jacobson
Close log in popup

Once again held at Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the 2014 WSOP tournament had 6,683 entrants and a prize pool of $62,820,200. The first person who got out at the final table (also known as the ninth-place winner) was Mark Newhouse, and he brought home $730,725. The second-place winner was Felix Stephensen, and he brought home $5,147,911. Martin Jacobson placed first and brought home a cool $10 million.

2nd place:
Felix Stephensen
3rd place:
Jorrytvan Hoof
# of players:
6,683
prize pool:
$62,820,200
Ryan Riess
$8,359,5351
2013
Ryan Riess

The 2013 WSOP tournament had 6,352 entrants and a prize pool of $59,708,800. The first-place winner, who was Ryan Riess (also known as "Reiss the Beast"), won $8,359,531. Jay Farber was the second-place winner and he netted himself a prize of $5,174,357. The tournament was held at Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Read more
Ryan Riess
Close log in popup

The 2013 WSOP tournament had 6,352 entrants and a prize pool of $59,708,800. The first-place winner, who was Ryan Riess (also known as "Reiss the Beast"), won $8,359,531. Jay Farber was the second-place winner and he netted himself a prize of $5,174,357. The tournament was held at Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

2nd place:
Jay Farber
3rd place:
Amir Lehavot
# of players:
6,352
prize pool:
$59,708,800
Greg Merson
$8,531,853
2012
Greg Merson

The 43rd annual WSOP event took place at Vegas's Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in 2012. In this tournament, a prize pool of $62,021,200 was created with 6,598 entrants. Everyone who placed in the top 666 won some money. The top nine players brought home at least $750,000. The second-place winner, Jesse Sylvia, won $5,295,149, and the first-place winner, Greg Merson, won $8,531,853.

Read more
Greg Merson
Close log in popup

The 43rd annual WSOP event took place at Vegas's Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in 2012. In this tournament, a prize pool of $62,021,200 was created with 6,598 entrants. Everyone who placed in the top 666 won some money. The top nine players brought home at least $750,000. The second-place winner, Jesse Sylvia, won $5,295,149, and the first-place winner, Greg Merson, won $8,531,853.

2nd place:
Jesse Sylvia
3rd place:
Jacob Balsiger
# of players:
6,598
prize pool:
$62,021,200
Pius Heinz
$8,715,638
2011
Pius Heinz

Hosted by Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the 2011 WSOP tournament attracted 6,865 entrants and a prize pool of $64,531,000 was put together. The first-place winner, Pius Heinz, got to bring home a good chunk of the prize. More specifically, he won $8,715,638. Martin Staszko, the second-place winner, made a pretty penny, too. In other words, he won $5,433,086.

Read more
Pius Heinz
Close log in popup

Hosted by Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the 2011 WSOP tournament attracted 6,865 entrants and a prize pool of $64,531,000 was put together. The first-place winner, Pius Heinz, got to bring home a good chunk of the prize. More specifically, he won $8,715,638. Martin Staszko, the second-place winner, made a pretty penny, too. In other words, he won $5,433,086.

2nd place:
Martin Staszko
3rd place:
Ben Lamb
# of players:
6,865
prize pool:
$64,531,000
Jonathan Duhamel
$8,944,138
2010
Jonathan Duhamel

With three WSOP bracelets and more than $14 million in poker tournament winnings, Jonathan Duhamel is a force to be reckoned with. In 2010 he nailed his opponents with a final hand of an Ace of spades and a Jack of hearts, beating out more than 7,000 players - the largest number of participants since 2006.

Read more
Jonathan Duhamel
Close log in popup

With three WSOP bracelets and more than $14 million in poker tournament winnings, Jonathan Duhamel is a force to be reckoned with. In 2010 he nailed his opponents with a final hand of an Ace of spades and a Jack of hearts, beating out more than 7,000 players - the largest number of participants since 2006.

2nd place:
John Racener
3rd place:
Joseph Cheong
# of players:
7,319
prize pool:
$68,799,059
Joe Cada
$8,574,649
2009
Joe Cada

Joe Cada represented a return to seasoned professionals winning the grand prize. Joe scooped the $8.5 million winnings with a pair of 9s, but currently holds 4 WSOP bracelets and has won in excess of $10 million in tournament cashes. His prize remained on par with 2007 and 2008's prize pool, but failed to reach the stunning highs of 2006.

Read more
Joe Cada
Close log in popup

Joe Cada represented a return to seasoned professionals winning the grand prize. Joe scooped the $8.5 million winnings with a pair of 9s, but currently holds 4 WSOP bracelets and has won in excess of $10 million in tournament cashes. His prize remained on par with 2007 and 2008's prize pool, but failed to reach the stunning highs of 2006.

2nd place:
Darvin Moon
3rd place:
Antoine Saout
# of players:
6,494
prize pool:
$61,043,600
Peter Eastgate
$9,152,416
2008
Peter Eastgate

“Isser” landed a win of more than 9 million dollars thanks to a final hand of an Ace of diamonds and a 5 of spades. The 22-year-old poker player beat 6,844 players to do so, and became the youngest Main Event winner, stealing Phil Hellmuth's record who won in 1989 at the age of 24. He's won another $300,000+ since then but hasn't secured any more WSOP bracelets.

Read more
Peter Eastgate
Close log in popup

“Isser” landed a win of more than 9 million dollars thanks to a final hand of an Ace of diamonds and a 5 of spades. The 22-year-old poker player beat 6,844 players to do so, and became the youngest Main Event winner, stealing Phil Hellmuth's record who won in 1989 at the age of 24. He's won another $300,000+ since then but hasn't secured any more WSOP bracelets.

2nd place:
Ivan Demidov
3rd place:
Dennis Phillips
# of players:
6,844
prize pool:
$64,431,779
Jerry Yang
$8,250,00
2007
Jerry Yang

Jerry Yang, who took home the grand prize with a pair of 8s, was one of over 6,000 players who got in on the action in 2007. At just over 8 million dollars, his winnings were much smaller than what Gold won the previous year. This remains The Shadow's only win of significance and the source of his sole WSOP bracelet.

Read more
Jerry Yang
Close log in popup

Jerry Yang, who took home the grand prize with a pair of 8s, was one of over 6,000 players who got in on the action in 2007. At just over 8 million dollars, his winnings were much smaller than what Gold won the previous year. This remains The Shadow's only win of significance and the source of his sole WSOP bracelet.

2nd place:
Tuan Lam
3rd place:
Raymond Rahme
# of players:
6,358
prize pool:
$59,784,954
Jamie Gold
$12,000,000
2006
Jamie Gold

Perhaps it's appropriate that a player named Jamie Gold won what was, and continues to be, the largest prize of any WSOP Main Event. Competing against close to 9,000 competitors, Gold secured the big money with a hand comprised of a Queen of spades and a 9 of clubs. It remains his only significant tournament win, and he's never won any other WSOP bracelets.

Read more
Jamie Gold
Close log in popup

Perhaps it's appropriate that a player named Jamie Gold won what was, and continues to be, the largest prize of any WSOP Main Event. Competing against close to 9,000 competitors, Gold secured the big money with a hand comprised of a Queen of spades and a 9 of clubs. It remains his only significant tournament win, and he's never won any other WSOP bracelets.

2nd place:
Paul Wasicka
3rd place:
Michael Binger
# of players:
8,773
prize pool:
$82,512,162
Joe Hachem
$7,500,000
2005
Joe Hachem

The number of participants in 2005 was more than double that of 2004. The prize pool also more than doubled, with over $50 million to play for. This was the first year in which the WSOP moved to the Rio All-Suites Casino and Hotel after the tournament was acquired by Harrah's in 2004. Joe Hachem, the first Australian player to win the Main Event, took home $7.5 million thanks to a 7 of clubs and a 3 of spades.

Read more
Joe Hachem
Close log in popup

The number of participants in 2005 was more than double that of 2004. The prize pool also more than doubled, with over $50 million to play for. This was the first year in which the WSOP moved to the Rio All-Suites Casino and Hotel after the tournament was acquired by Harrah's in 2004. Joe Hachem, the first Australian player to win the Main Event, took home $7.5 million thanks to a 7 of clubs and a 3 of spades.

2nd place:
Steve Dannenmann
3rd place:
Tex Barch
# of players:
5,619
prize pool:
$52,818,610
Greg Raymer
$5,000,000
2004
Greg Raymer

The number of Main Event competitors was more than double that of the previous year, with more than 2,500 players in the mix and a huge prize pool of close to $25 million. Greg Raymer, or Fossilman, landed a $5 million jackpot with a pocket pair of 8s. This is his only WSOP bracelet win.

Read more
Greg Raymer
Close log in popup

The number of Main Event competitors was more than double that of the previous year, with more than 2,500 players in the mix and a huge prize pool of close to $25 million. Greg Raymer, or Fossilman, landed a $5 million jackpot with a pocket pair of 8s. This is his only WSOP bracelet win.

2nd place:
David Williams
3rd place:
Josh Arieh
# of players:
2,576
prize pool:
$24,224,400
Chris Moneymaker
$2,500,000
2003
Chris Moneymaker

As the first WSOP Main Event winner who qualified via an online poker site, the appropriately named Moneymaker took home $2.5 million with a final hand of a 5 of diamonds and a 4 of spades. It's ironic that such a mediocre hand saw him triumph over more than 800 competitors. Moneymaker doesn't have many tournament wins except for this one, but remains an important figure to online players.

Read more
Chris Moneymaker
Close log in popup

As the first WSOP Main Event winner who qualified via an online poker site, the appropriately named Moneymaker took home $2.5 million with a final hand of a 5 of diamonds and a 4 of spades. It's ironic that such a mediocre hand saw him triumph over more than 800 competitors. Moneymaker doesn't have many tournament wins except for this one, but remains an important figure to online players.

2nd place:
Sammy Farha
3rd place:
Dan Harrington
# of players:
839
prize pool:
$7,802,700
Robert Varkonyi
$2,500,000
2002
Robert Varkonyi

The year 2002 saw the grand prize associated with the WSOP Main Event rise yet again. Robert Varkonyi scooped the $2 million prize with a Queen of diamonds and a 10 of spades, beating out 630 other players along the way. It remains his only WSOP bracelet win. He never made much of a splash in the tournament scene afterwards, but given the size of his Main Event prize, we're sure he doesn't mind.

Read more
Robert Varkonyi
Close log in popup

The year 2002 saw the grand prize associated with the WSOP Main Event rise yet again. Robert Varkonyi scooped the $2 million prize with a Queen of diamonds and a 10 of spades, beating out 630 other players along the way. It remains his only WSOP bracelet win. He never made much of a splash in the tournament scene afterwards, but given the size of his Main Event prize, we're sure he doesn't mind.

2nd place:
Julian Gardner
3rd place:
Ralph Perry
# of players:
631
prize pool:
$6,130,000
Carlos Mortensen
$1,500,000
2001
Carlos Mortensen

A record was broken in 2001 when Mortensen, known as El Matador, became the only player of South American descent to ever win the WSOP Main Event. He picked a fine year to do it, seeing off more than 600 participants and taking home $1.5 million. Since then, he's more than doubled that figure, gaining over $3 million in tournament winnings.

Read more
Carlos Mortensen
Close log in popup

A record was broken in 2001 when Mortensen, known as El Matador, became the only player of South American descent to ever win the WSOP Main Event. He picked a fine year to do it, seeing off more than 600 participants and taking home $1.5 million. Since then, he's more than doubled that figure, gaining over $3 million in tournament winnings.

2nd place:
Dewey Tomko
3rd place:
Stanley Schrier
# of players:
613
prize pool:
$6,130,000
Chris Ferguson
$1,500,000
2000
Chris Ferguson

2000 saw Chris Ferguson triumph over more than 500 players to scoop the WSOP Main Event bracelet. The grand prize of $1.5 million marked the first time that the winnings associated with the Main Event had risen in 9 years. Chris Ferguson has since racked up more than $5 million worth of tournament wins and an impressive 6 WSOP bracelets.

Read more
Chris Ferguson
Close log in popup

2000 saw Chris Ferguson triumph over more than 500 players to scoop the WSOP Main Event bracelet. The grand prize of $1.5 million marked the first time that the winnings associated with the Main Event had risen in 9 years. Chris Ferguson has since racked up more than $5 million worth of tournament wins and an impressive 6 WSOP bracelets.

2nd place:
TJ Cloutier
3rd place:
Steve Kaufman
# of players:
512
prize pool:
$5,120,000
Noel Furlong
$1,000,000
1999
Noel Furlong

The final WSOP Main Event of the 90s was one to remember: 1999's big game saw an Irish businessman named Noel Furlong take the big prize with a pair of fives. It would turn out to be his only WSOP bracelet and the only significant tournament win he's had to date. It's perhaps no coincidence that his triumph over established pros would be accompanied by a sharp rise in the number of participants and a larger prize pool the following year.

Read more
Noel Furlong
Close log in popup

The final WSOP Main Event of the 90s was one to remember: 1999's big game saw an Irish businessman named Noel Furlong take the big prize with a pair of fives. It would turn out to be his only WSOP bracelet and the only significant tournament win he's had to date. It's perhaps no coincidence that his triumph over established pros would be accompanied by a sharp rise in the number of participants and a larger prize pool the following year.

2nd place:
Alan Goehring
3rd place:
Padraig Parkinson
# of players:
393
prize pool:
$3,930,000
Scott Nguyen
$1,000,000
1998
Scott Nguyen

In 1998, The Train (or The Prince of Poker) took home a million-dollar prize thanks to a Jack of diamonds and a 9 of clubs. This accounts for one of his five WSOP bracelets and just a fraction of his $6 million total tournament winnings. Nguyen beat out more than 300 players to take home the grand prize.

Read more
Scott Nguyen
Close log in popup

In 1998, The Train (or The Prince of Poker) took home a million-dollar prize thanks to a Jack of diamonds and a 9 of clubs. This accounts for one of his five WSOP bracelets and just a fraction of his $6 million total tournament winnings. Nguyen beat out more than 300 players to take home the grand prize.

2nd place:
Kevin McBride
3rd place:
TJ Cloutier
# of players:
350
prize pool:
$3,500,000
Stu Ungar
$1,000,000
1997
Stu Ungar

After more than 15 years without a top 3 finish in the WSOP Main Event, 1997 saw Stuey take home the grand prize for a third time. He is one of just two people to win the Main Event three times (the other being Johnny Moss). Stu Ungar is regarded by many as the greatest Texas Hold ‘Em player of all time. He clinched the million-dollar prize with an Ace of hearts and a 4 of clubs.

Read more
Stu Ungar
Close log in popup

After more than 15 years without a top 3 finish in the WSOP Main Event, 1997 saw Stuey take home the grand prize for a third time. He is one of just two people to win the Main Event three times (the other being Johnny Moss). Stu Ungar is regarded by many as the greatest Texas Hold ‘Em player of all time. He clinched the million-dollar prize with an Ace of hearts and a 4 of clubs.

2nd place:
John Strzemp
3rd place:
Mel Judah
# of players:
312
prize pool:
$3,120,000
Huck Seed
$1,000,000
1996
Huck Seed

One of the most interesting facts about the 1996 Main Event is that Huck Seed's winning hand – 9 and 8 of diamonds – is exactly the same as the one Dan Harrington won the 1995 tournament with. Huck now has 4 WSOP bracelets and has won more than $2 million in his professional career. He saw off Bruce Van Horn, John Bonetti, and close to 300 other players in the WSOP Main Event.

Read more
Huck Seed
Close log in popup

One of the most interesting facts about the 1996 Main Event is that Huck Seed's winning hand – 9 and 8 of diamonds – is exactly the same as the one Dan Harrington won the 1995 tournament with. Huck now has 4 WSOP bracelets and has won more than $2 million in his professional career. He saw off Bruce Van Horn, John Bonetti, and close to 300 other players in the WSOP Main Event.

2nd place:
Bruce Van Horn
3rd place:
John Bonetti
# of players:
295
prize pool:
$2,950,000
Dan Harrington
$1,000,000
1995
Dan Harrington

Action Dan took home the grand prize at the 1995 WSOP Main Event thanks to a 9 and 8 of diamonds, providing a big spark to a professional career that's seen him rack up more than 6 million dollars in tournament wins. He also added another WSOP bracelet to his Main Event win, so he now has one for each wrist!

Read more
Dan Harrington
Close log in popup

Action Dan took home the grand prize at the 1995 WSOP Main Event thanks to a 9 and 8 of diamonds, providing a big spark to a professional career that's seen him rack up more than 6 million dollars in tournament wins. He also added another WSOP bracelet to his Main Event win, so he now has one for each wrist!

2nd place:
Howard Goldfarb
3rd place:
Brent Carter
# of players:
273
prize pool:
$2,730,000
Russ Hamilton
$1,000,000
1994
Russ Hamilton

Scoring the $1 million prize with a King of spades and an 8 of hearts, this marks Russ Hamilton's only WSOP bracelet and the biggest win of his career. The Main Event prize in 1994 also included Hamilton's body weight in silver! Since then Hamilton has, however, added another quarter of a million to his professional poker winnings. He also served as a consultant with Ultimate Bet immediately after winning the WSOP Main Event.

Read more
Russ Hamilton
Close log in popup

Scoring the $1 million prize with a King of spades and an 8 of hearts, this marks Russ Hamilton's only WSOP bracelet and the biggest win of his career. The Main Event prize in 1994 also included Hamilton's body weight in silver! Since then Hamilton has, however, added another quarter of a million to his professional poker winnings. He also served as a consultant with Ultimate Bet immediately after winning the WSOP Main Event.

2nd place:
Hugh Vincent
3rd place:
John Spadavecchia
# of players:
268
prize pool:
$2,680,000
Jim Bechtel
$1,000,000
1993
Jim Bechtel

With the Main Event on the upswing in 1993 – 30 more players than last year and another $300,000 in the prize pool – Jim Bechtel faced stiff competition to land a $1 million grand prize. He won with a Jack and 6 of spades. Since then he's won another WSOP bracelet and has almost doubled the value of his winnings playing professional poker.

Read more
Jim Bechtel
Close log in popup

With the Main Event on the upswing in 1993 – 30 more players than last year and another $300,000 in the prize pool – Jim Bechtel faced stiff competition to land a $1 million grand prize. He won with a Jack and 6 of spades. Since then he's won another WSOP bracelet and has almost doubled the value of his winnings playing professional poker.

2nd place:
Glenn Cozen
3rd place:
John Bonetti
# of players:
231
prize pool:
$2,308,000
Hamid Dastmalchi
$1,000,000
1992
Hamid Dastmalchi

Armed with just an 8 of hearts and a 4 of clubs, some daring play from Dastmalchi resulted in him taking home the second $1 million prize awarded at the WSOP Main Event. Since then, Hamid has earned another $600,000+ and a couple of additional WSOP bracelets, but didn't manage to place highly in the Main Event again.

Read more
Hamid Dastmalchi
Close log in popup

Armed with just an 8 of hearts and a 4 of clubs, some daring play from Dastmalchi resulted in him taking home the second $1 million prize awarded at the WSOP Main Event. Since then, Hamid has earned another $600,000+ and a couple of additional WSOP bracelets, but didn't manage to place highly in the Main Event again.

2nd place:
Thomas Jacobs
3rd place:
Hans Lund
# of players:
201
prize pool:
$2,010,000
Brad Daugherty
$1,000,000
1991
Brad Daugherty

In 1991, the grand prize of the WSOP Main Event reached 1 million dollars for the first time. It remained at this level throughout the rest of the ‘90s. Daugherty took home the big money thanks to a King and Jack of spades. This remains his only significant tournament win, and only WSOP bracelet.

Read more
Brad Daugherty
Close log in popup

In 1991, the grand prize of the WSOP Main Event reached 1 million dollars for the first time. It remained at this level throughout the rest of the ‘90s. Daugherty took home the big money thanks to a King and Jack of spades. This remains his only significant tournament win, and only WSOP bracelet.

2nd place:
Don Holt
3rd place:
Robert Veltri
# of players:
215
prize pool:
$2,150,000
Mansour Matloubi
$835,000
1990
Mansour Matloubi

The first Main Event of the 1990s saw the Iranian-British Matloubi outlast close to 200 players for a grand prize of more than $800,000. He was able to do this with a fairly modest hand – pocket sixes. It remains his only WSOP Main Event win, but he has since made more than 6 million dollars playing poker professionally.

Read more
Mansour Matloubi
Close log in popup

The first Main Event of the 1990s saw the Iranian-British Matloubi outlast close to 200 players for a grand prize of more than $800,000. He was able to do this with a fairly modest hand – pocket sixes. It remains his only WSOP Main Event win, but he has since made more than 6 million dollars playing poker professionally.

2nd place:
Hans Lund
3rd place:
Dave Crunkleton
# of players:
194
prize pool:
$1,940,000
Phil Hellmuth
$755,000
1989
Phil Hellmuth

A true star of professional poker, 1989 remains The Poker Brat's only Main Event win. He won the European Main Event as recently as 2012, however, and holds a world record with his 15 WSOP bracelets. He's also won more than 14 million dollars in his professional career! In 1989, he had a pocket pair of 9s to thank for taking home the first Main Event prize to top three quarters of a million dollars.

Read more
Phil Hellmuth
Close log in popup

A true star of professional poker, 1989 remains The Poker Brat's only Main Event win. He won the European Main Event as recently as 2012, however, and holds a world record with his 15 WSOP bracelets. He's also won more than 14 million dollars in his professional career! In 1989, he had a pocket pair of 9s to thank for taking home the first Main Event prize to top three quarters of a million dollars.

2nd place:
Johnny Chan
3rd place:
Don Zewin
# of players:
178
prize pool:
$1,780,000
Johnny Chan
$700,000
1988
Johnny Chan

More players competed in this Main Event than ever before. Chan took home his second (and back to back) championship win. This meant he won in excess of a million dollars in just a couple of years. He would go on to quadruple that figure in his professional poker career. His winning hand was a Jack and 9 of clubs.

Read more
Johnny Chan
Close log in popup

More players competed in this Main Event than ever before. Chan took home his second (and back to back) championship win. This meant he won in excess of a million dollars in just a couple of years. He would go on to quadruple that figure in his professional poker career. His winning hand was a Jack and 9 of clubs.

2nd place:
Erik Seidel
3rd place:
Ronald Graham
# of players:
167
prize pool:
$1,670,000
Johnny Chan
$625,000
1987
Johnny Chan

The Main Event was starting to bounce back in 1987, with more players and a larger grand prize. Johnny Chan, also known as the Orient Express, took home more than $600,000 with an Ace of spades and a 9 of clubs. He beat out Frank Henderson and Bob Ciaffone to score his first, but not his last, Main Event win, and now boasts 10 WSOP bracelets.

Read more
Johnny Chan
Close log in popup

The Main Event was starting to bounce back in 1987, with more players and a larger grand prize. Johnny Chan, also known as the Orient Express, took home more than $600,000 with an Ace of spades and a 9 of clubs. He beat out Frank Henderson and Bob Ciaffone to score his first, but not his last, Main Event win, and now boasts 10 WSOP bracelets.

2nd place:
Frank Henderson
3rd place:
Bob Ciaffone
# of players:
152
prize pool:
$1,520,000
Berry Johnston
$570,000
1986
Berry Johnston

The WSOP slowed down a little in the late ‘80s - the number of players in the Main Event remained fairly stagnant and Johnston's prize was down more than $100,000 from the previous year. Still, Johnston took home more than half a million dollars thanks to an Ace of spades and 10 of hearts. Johnston went on to win a total of 5 WSOP bracelets and more than 2.25 million dollars in his career.

Read more
Berry Johnston
Close log in popup

The WSOP slowed down a little in the late ‘80s - the number of players in the Main Event remained fairly stagnant and Johnston's prize was down more than $100,000 from the previous year. Still, Johnston took home more than half a million dollars thanks to an Ace of spades and 10 of hearts. Johnston went on to win a total of 5 WSOP bracelets and more than 2.25 million dollars in his career.

2nd place:
Mike Harthcock
3rd place:
Gary Berland
# of players:
141
prize pool:
$1,410,000
Bill Smith
$700,000
1985
Bill Smith

A pocket pair of 3s might not seem like the greatest hand in the world, but it was enough for Bill Smith to clinch the 1985 Main Event. This was his only major WSOP win and, with the exception of other minor winnings, the only real cash Smith ever made in big-name poker tournaments.

Read more
Bill Smith
Close log in popup

A pocket pair of 3s might not seem like the greatest hand in the world, but it was enough for Bill Smith to clinch the 1985 Main Event. This was his only major WSOP win and, with the exception of other minor winnings, the only real cash Smith ever made in big-name poker tournaments.

2nd place:
TJ Cloutier
3rd place:
Berry Johnston
# of players:
140
prize pool:
$1,400,000
Jack Keller
$660,000
1984
Jack Keller

Jack Keller, also known as the Gentleman, scored $660,000 in the WSOP Main Event with a pair of 10s. This was Keller's only Main Event win, but he racked up more than 2 million dollars in total tournament winnings and snagged himself a couple of additional WSOP bracelets along the way.

Read more
Jack Keller
Close log in popup

Jack Keller, also known as the Gentleman, scored $660,000 in the WSOP Main Event with a pair of 10s. This was Keller's only Main Event win, but he racked up more than 2 million dollars in total tournament winnings and snagged himself a couple of additional WSOP bracelets along the way.

2nd place:
Byron Wolford
3rd place:
Jesse Alto
# of players:
132
prize pool:
$1,320,000
Tom McEvoy
$540,000
1983
Tom McEvoy

Grand Rapids Tom, as McEvoy is sometimes known, scored the grand prize in the 1983 Main Event with a pair of Queens. A regular on the WSOP circuit, Tom landed 4 bracelets (and well over a million dollars) in his career but this marked his only Main Event win. Even so, he's a member of the Poker Hall of Fame! You'll also notice a familiar name, Doyle Brunson, appear in the top 3 once again.

Read more
Tom McEvoy
Close log in popup

Grand Rapids Tom, as McEvoy is sometimes known, scored the grand prize in the 1983 Main Event with a pair of Queens. A regular on the WSOP circuit, Tom landed 4 bracelets (and well over a million dollars) in his career but this marked his only Main Event win. Even so, he's a member of the Poker Hall of Fame! You'll also notice a familiar name, Doyle Brunson, appear in the top 3 once again.

2nd place:
Rod Peate
3rd place:
Doyle Brunson
# of players:
108
prize pool:
$1,080,000
Jack Straus
$520,000
1982
Jack Straus

Landing the first grand prize totalling more than half a million dollars, Jack Straus landed his big win with an Ace of hearts and a 10 of spades. This was the player known as Treetop's only major tournament win, but he was able to secure another WSOP bracelet in his career. 1982 also marked the first time the number of players competing in the Main Event exceeded 100 players.

Read more
Jack Straus
Close log in popup

Landing the first grand prize totalling more than half a million dollars, Jack Straus landed his big win with an Ace of hearts and a 10 of spades. This was the player known as Treetop's only major tournament win, but he was able to secure another WSOP bracelet in his career. 1982 also marked the first time the number of players competing in the Main Event exceeded 100 players.

2nd place:
Dewey Tomko
3rd place:
Berry Johnston
# of players:
104
prize pool:
$1,040,000
Stu Ungar
$375,000
1981
Stu Ungar

Another year, another WSOP Main Event victory for Stu! Also known as The Kid, Stu took the grand prize with a great hand of Ace and Queen, suited in hearts. The grand prize was roughly the same as in 1980, giving Stu winnings of almost three quarters of a million dollars in just two years! This marked Stu's last top finish at the Main Event for more than a decade but, as we'll see later, it would not be the end of his story.

Read more
Stu Ungar
Close log in popup

Another year, another WSOP Main Event victory for Stu! Also known as The Kid, Stu took the grand prize with a great hand of Ace and Queen, suited in hearts. The grand prize was roughly the same as in 1980, giving Stu winnings of almost three quarters of a million dollars in just two years! This marked Stu's last top finish at the Main Event for more than a decade but, as we'll see later, it would not be the end of his story.

2nd place:
Perry Green
3rd place:
Gene Fisher
# of players:
75
prize pool:
$750,000
Stu Ungar
$365,000
1980
Stu Ungar

1980 marked Stu Ungar's first, but certainly not last, Main Event win at the WSOP. With a hand of 5 and 4, both spades, he took home a huge $365,000 prize. Ungar was just 26 years old at the time of his victory, making him the youngest Main Event winner in history at the time (and for some time afterwards). This year also saw Doyle Brunson come in 2nd place, his third top 2 finish in the five tournaments held between 1976 and 1980.

Read more
Stu Ungar
Close log in popup

1980 marked Stu Ungar's first, but certainly not last, Main Event win at the WSOP. With a hand of 5 and 4, both spades, he took home a huge $365,000 prize. Ungar was just 26 years old at the time of his victory, making him the youngest Main Event winner in history at the time (and for some time afterwards). This year also saw Doyle Brunson come in 2nd place, his third top 2 finish in the five tournaments held between 1976 and 1980.

2nd place:
Doyle Brunson
3rd place:
Jay Heimowitz
# of players:
73
prize pool:
$730,000
Hal Fowler
$270,000
1979
Hal Fowler

The final WSOP of the 1970s saw Hal Fowler fight off more than 50 players to take home over a quarter of a million dollars with a hand comprised of a 7 of spades and a 6 of diamonds. An unremarkable hand, this marked Hal Fowler's only WSOP bracelet and only significant poker tournament win. This year's tournament drew lots of attention because it marked the first time an amateur player triumphed over established pros.

Read more
Hal Fowler
Close log in popup

The final WSOP of the 1970s saw Hal Fowler fight off more than 50 players to take home over a quarter of a million dollars with a hand comprised of a 7 of spades and a 6 of diamonds. An unremarkable hand, this marked Hal Fowler's only WSOP bracelet and only significant poker tournament win. This year's tournament drew lots of attention because it marked the first time an amateur player triumphed over established pros.

2nd place:
Bobby Hoff
3rd place:
George Huber
# of players:
54
prize pool:
$540,000
Bobby Baldwin
$210,000
1978
Bobby Baldwin

Bizarrely, despite beating 41 other players (a significant increase on the previous year) with a pocket pair of Queens, Bobby Baldwin took home a grand prize close to half that of the 1977 WSOP Main Event. This marked the third time Crandall Addington took 2nd place in the tournament, never again appearing in the top 3 of the Main Event.

Read more
Bobby Baldwin
Close log in popup

Bizarrely, despite beating 41 other players (a significant increase on the previous year) with a pocket pair of Queens, Bobby Baldwin took home a grand prize close to half that of the 1977 WSOP Main Event. This marked the third time Crandall Addington took 2nd place in the tournament, never again appearing in the top 3 of the Main Event.

2nd place:
Crandall Addington
3rd place:
Louis Hunsaker
# of players:
42
prize pool:
$420,000
Doyle Brunson
$340,000
1977
Doyle Brunson

Texas Dolly snared over half a million dollars in prize money in 1976 and 1977 alone. Unbelievably, his final hand in 1977 was the same as in 1976 – a 10 and 2 – but wasn't even suited this time. He saw off 33 other players during the Main Event, a big jump from the previous year's 22 players.

Read more
Doyle Brunson
Close log in popup

Texas Dolly snared over half a million dollars in prize money in 1976 and 1977 alone. Unbelievably, his final hand in 1977 was the same as in 1976 – a 10 and 2 – but wasn't even suited this time. He saw off 33 other players during the Main Event, a big jump from the previous year's 22 players.

2nd place:
Gary Berland
3rd place:
Milo Jacbobson
# of players:
34
prize pool:
$340,000
Doyle Brunson
$220,000
1976
Doyle Brunson

Doyle Brunson, who won the 1976 WSOP with a 2 and 10 of spades, holds a certain place in WSOP history: this year was the first tournament during which WSOP bracelets were issued. It's perhaps fitting, therefore, that Doyle holds 10 WSOP bracelets in total which puts him (tied with Johnny Chan) second only to Phil Hellmuth. With a grand prize of more than $200,000, there's no denying that 1976 was a good year for Texas Dolly!

Read more
Doyle Brunson
Close log in popup

Doyle Brunson, who won the 1976 WSOP with a 2 and 10 of spades, holds a certain place in WSOP history: this year was the first tournament during which WSOP bracelets were issued. It's perhaps fitting, therefore, that Doyle holds 10 WSOP bracelets in total which puts him (tied with Johnny Chan) second only to Phil Hellmuth. With a grand prize of more than $200,000, there's no denying that 1976 was a good year for Texas Dolly!

2nd place:
Jesse Alto
3rd place:
Tommy Hufnagle
# of players:
22
prize pool:
$220,000
Bryan Roberts
$210,000
1975
Bryan Roberts

Thanks to a pocket pair of Jacks, Bryan Roberts took home a grand prize of more than $200,000 after facing off against 20 opponents. Like Puggy, the player known as Sailor is one of a few early WSOP winners to win the tournament just once. He was, however, able to secure two WSOP bracelets in his poker career.

Read more
Bryan Roberts
Close log in popup

Thanks to a pocket pair of Jacks, Bryan Roberts took home a grand prize of more than $200,000 after facing off against 20 opponents. Like Puggy, the player known as Sailor is one of a few early WSOP winners to win the tournament just once. He was, however, able to secure two WSOP bracelets in his poker career.

2nd place:
Bob Hooks
3rd place:
Crandall Addington
# of players:
21
prize pool:
$210,000
Johnny Moss
$160,000
1974
Johnny Moss

Taking first place once again in 1974, Johnny Moss achieved the staggering feat of winning 3 of the first 5 WSOP tournaments. Armed with just a pocket pair of threes for his final hand, he took home a grand prize of more than 5 times what he scored last time he won the WSOP. This also marked the first time Crandall Addington came in 2nd place, a feat he repeated several times, though he was never able to win a Main Event.

Read more
Johnny Moss
Close log in popup

Taking first place once again in 1974, Johnny Moss achieved the staggering feat of winning 3 of the first 5 WSOP tournaments. Armed with just a pocket pair of threes for his final hand, he took home a grand prize of more than 5 times what he scored last time he won the WSOP. This also marked the first time Crandall Addington came in 2nd place, a feat he repeated several times, though he was never able to win a Main Event.

2nd place:
Crandall Addington
3rd place:
Sailor Roberts
# of players:
16
prize pool:
$160,000
Walter Pearson
$130,000
1973
Walter Pearson

Walter Pearson, also known as Puggy, took home a hefty cash prize in excess of $100,000 with an Ace and 7 of spades. 1973 marked the first year that the WSOP Main Event was televised on CBS Sports, and the tournament was off to a fast start with no signs of slowing down. It's worth pointing out that Johnny Moss – already a two-time WSOP champ – came in 2nd place, hot on the heels of Puggy.

Read more
Walter Pearson
Close log in popup

Walter Pearson, also known as Puggy, took home a hefty cash prize in excess of $100,000 with an Ace and 7 of spades. 1973 marked the first year that the WSOP Main Event was televised on CBS Sports, and the tournament was off to a fast start with no signs of slowing down. It's worth pointing out that Johnny Moss – already a two-time WSOP champ – came in 2nd place, hot on the heels of Puggy.

2nd place:
Johnny Moss
3rd place:
Jack Straus
# of players:
13
prize pool:
$130,000
Thomas Preston
$80,000
1972
Thomas Preston

Thanks to a well-timed King and Jack, “Amarillo Slim” was able to win his first WSOP championship, scoring $80,000 - more than double what the previous winner had taken home! His win was regarded by many as an upset, and he went on a publicity tour afterwards that brought the WSOP a great deal of media attention.

Read more
Thomas Preston
Close log in popup

Thanks to a well-timed King and Jack, “Amarillo Slim” was able to win his first WSOP championship, scoring $80,000 - more than double what the previous winner had taken home! His win was regarded by many as an upset, and he went on a publicity tour afterwards that brought the WSOP a great deal of media attention.

2nd place:
Walter "Puggy" Pearson
3rd place:
Doyle Brunson
# of players:
8
prize pool:
$80,000
Johnny Moss
$30,000
1971
Johnny Moss

Taking first place once again in 1974, Johnny Moss achieved the staggering feat of winning 3 of the first 5 WSOP tournaments. Armed with just a pocket pair of threes for his final hand, he took home a grand prize of more than 5 times what he scored last time he won the WSOP. This also marked the first time Crandall Addington came in 2nd place, a feat he repeated several times, though he was never able to win a Main Event.

Read more
Johnny Moss
Close log in popup

Taking first place once again in 1974, Johnny Moss achieved the staggering feat of winning 3 of the first 5 WSOP tournaments. Armed with just a pocket pair of threes for his final hand, he took home a grand prize of more than 5 times what he scored last time he won the WSOP. This also marked the first time Crandall Addington came in 2nd place, a feat he repeated several times, though he was never able to win a Main Event.

2nd place:
-
3rd place:
-
# of players:
6
prize pool:
$30,000
Johnny Moss
-
1970
Johnny Moss

With its freeze-out tournament format, the first WSOP event was decided not with a single hand, but with a vote from the players who competed in it. As legend has it, all players voted for themselves as “the best player in the world” but a vote for the “second best player in the world” saw Moss crowned as the winner. Notably, many of the other players who competed in the tournament would go on to win WSOP titles of their own.

Read more
Johnny Moss
Close log in popup

With its freeze-out tournament format, the first WSOP event was decided not with a single hand, but with a vote from the players who competed in it. As legend has it, all players voted for themselves as “the best player in the world” but a vote for the “second best player in the world” saw Moss crowned as the winner. Notably, many of the other players who competed in the tournament would go on to win WSOP titles of their own.

2nd place:
-
3rd place:
-
# of players:
7
prize pool:
-
load more

World Series of Poker FAQs

When is the World Series of Poker?

The 2022 WSOP takes place from Tuesday May 31 through July 20 at Bally's Las Vegas Hotel & Casino and Paris Las Vegas.

How does the WSOP work?

The World Series of Poker is made up of 88 events. The events are in tournament format, and every player in a given tournament starts with the same number of chips. The winner of each event is the last player standing, who then takes home the prize money and a WSOP bracelet.

Most of the events are variants of Texas Hold'em, however games such as Omaha and Seven-card Stud also feature.

All events have different buy-ins, and the number of entrants can differ, so the prize money will also vary. The winner of the WSOP Main Event will take home millions of dollars, as well as a coveted WSOP bracelet, worth approximately $500,000.

What is the buy-in for WSOP 2022?

Buy-ins for the 2022 World Series of Poker will start as low as $400 and go as high as $250,000. The buy-in for the Main Event is $10,000.

How do I enter WSOP 2022?

You can enter the WSOP in person at the Champagne Ballroom in Paris Las Vegas, or you can register online by heading to the official WSOP website. You can also win seats via satellites or online qualifiers. Read more about how to enter the World Series of poker.

Where can I find WSOP updates?

We'll post WSOP news and updates throughout the tournament, so be sure to check out our news page!

Where can I find the WSOP schedule?

We've got the current WSOP schedule here on this page. It specifies the event, the date, the duration and the buy-in cost.

Who won WSOP in 2021?

Koray Aldemir won the World Series of Poker in 2021. The German poker player took away $8,000,000 and the coveted gold bracelet. Check out our full list of previous winners.

What channel is the World Series of Poker on?

The WSOP 2022 will be broadcast on CBS Sports.

How can I get free chips on WSOP?

You’ll need to buy-in or win your seat to get your WSOP chips. However, for some fun, you can download the WSOP social poker app and get free chips just by signing up.

How much does the winner of the WSOP Main Event get?

The winner of the Main Event gets a multi-million-dollar prize and a WSOP bracelet worth up to $500,000. The exact cash prize amount is dependent on the number of players (the more players that join, the higher the prizepool), but 2021's winner won a staggering $8,000,000.

How much is a World Series of Poker bracelet worth?

These days, a Main Event bracelet is worth approximately $500,000. As an example, the 2016 bracelet featured almost 500g of white and yellow gold, as well as white diamonds, black diamonds and rubies, making it almost 45 carats.

Not all bracelets are worth so much. In 2010, Peter Eastgate sold his bracelet on eBay for $147,500, while Jamie Gold sold his bracelet for $65,725 at auction in 2013. However, they were probably worth a lot more!