In the money

shim36

shim36

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Apr 3, 2021
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How likely are you to get "In the money"?
Also, what are the odds of in the money for the top professionals?

Some people seem to think only of ROI.

※I'm still a beginner, so I need some indicators.
 
shim36

shim36

Rock Star
Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Total posts
135
How likely are you to get "In the money"?
Also, what are the odds of in the money for the top professionals?

Some people seem to think only of ROI.

※I'm still a beginner, so I need some indicators.
 
F

fundiver199

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That will obviously depend how, how many players get paid relative to, how many entered the tournament. It will also depend on, if reenty is possible, and if so if you are willing to fire multible bullets. Finally it will depend on, how much of a skill edge (if any) you have on the field.

If those "top professionals" play in tough fields, they are not going to be cashing significantly more often than the average. It can also depend a little bit of style, since some might find edge by cashing more often, and others by "going for the gold" at the expense of not cashing so often.

Just to give an example we can take a look at, how I have been doing in 45 man SnGs on pokerstars. In these 7 people get paid, and there is no reentry, so an average player will be in the money 15,6% of the time. In my current database I have played 302 1$ 45 mans and cashed in 22,2% for an ROI of 31%. I have also played 274 3,5$ 45 mans, and in these I have only cashed in 15,3% for an ROI of 7%.

Some of those differences might be due to variance over some still fairly small samples. But its certainly not unreasonable to say, that the average quality of play in the 3,5$ version is probably higher than in the 1$ version. As a result I have cashes less often, and I have a lower ROI. In fact the only reason I have a positive ROI in the 3,5$ events, is because, I have done well after cashing taking 10 wins and 7 second places, where the average would only have been 6 of each.

And this also explain, why professional poker players and anyone else serious about the game tend to focus on ROI rather than the percentage of the time, they cash. Its ROI, that makes the bankroll grow and pay the bills for professional players, not how often they cash. Serious poker players use bankroll management, and if for instance I have 100 times the buyin for a 45 man SnG, it does not matter, if I fail to cash in 10 or even 20 in a row, since I still have plenty of money left to play.
 
shim36

shim36

Rock Star
Joined
Apr 3, 2021
Total posts
135
That will obviously depend how, how many players get paid relative to, how many entered the tournament. It will also depend on, if reenty is possible, and if so if you are willing to fire multible bullets. Finally it will depend on, how much of a skill edge (if any) you have on the field.

If those "top professionals" play in tough fields, they are not going to be cashing significantly more often than the average. It can also depend a little bit of style, since some might find edge by cashing more often, and others by "going for the gold" at the expense of not cashing so often.

Just to give an example we can take a look at, how I have been doing in 45 man SnGs on PokerStars. In these 7 people get paid, and there is no reentry, so an average player will be in the money 15,6% of the time. In my current database I have played 302 1$ 45 mans and cashed in 22,2% for an ROI of 31%. I have also played 274 3,5$ 45 mans, and in these I have only cashed in 15,3% for an ROI of 7%.

Some of those differences might be due to variance over some still fairly small samples. But its certainly not unreasonable to say, that the average quality of play in the 3,5$ version is probably higher than in the 1$ version. As a result I have cashes less often, and I have a lower ROI. In fact the only reason I have a positive ROI in the 3,5$ events, is because, I have done well after cashing taking 10 wins and 7 second places, where the average would only have been 6 of each.

And this also explain, why professional poker players and anyone else serious about the game tend to focus on ROI rather than the percentage of the time, they cash. Its ROI, that makes the bankroll grow and pay the bills for professional players, not how often they cash. Serious poker players use bankroll management, and if for instance I have 100 times the buyin for a 45 man SnG, it does not matter, if I fail to cash in 10 or even 20 in a row, since I still have plenty of money left to play.



It's very logical, easy to understand and helpful.
I'm going to think about this one more time in my own way.
 
David macdonald

David macdonald

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How likely are you to get "In the money"?
Also, what are the odds of in the money for the top professionals?

Some people seem to think only of ROI.

※I'm still a beginner, so I need some indicators.
If you are basing it on ROI then this will give you a good idea because it's a percentage of the profit from your stake. If your ROI is consistent then it's easier to work out but that's unlikely due to variance in poker but will give you a guideline.

ROI is calculated by subtracting the initial value of the investment from the final value of the investment (which equals the net return), then dividing this new number (the net return) by the cost of the investment, and, finally, multiplying it by 100.

BRM (bank roll management) is what you really want to focus on to get your ROI to come up. You should only play 1-2% of your bankroll per game. If you are depositing let's say 20 dollars and playing 5+10 dollar games your never going to profit.
 
deputat777

deputat777

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investing is always a risk, so be careful.
 
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