Rookie Mistakes

t1riel

t1riel

Legend
Here's an article about Rookie Mistakes:

Rookie mistakes lead to disappointing games[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Here is my list of the top 10 mistakes rookie players make at the poker table. If you see yourself represented here, it's time to make some changes to your game.

Bluffing too much. Most rookies have watched too many Hollywood movies and have convinced themselves that poker is all about bluffing. Somehow, they think that if they just keep betting, everyone will get out of their way. That's unlikely, because a habitual bluffer is easily identified by his opponents early on.

Lack of patience. Playing poker means you'll go through long stretches of boring hands waiting for good cards. Rookies often don't have the patience to wait for quality cards, so, out of boredom, they start playing hands they know they shouldn't. Don't lose your patience, find it.

Playing unaffordable limits. Nothing is more detrimental to your confidence, and your bankroll, than gambling with money you can't afford to lose. You simply can't make smart decisions when you're also worrying about how you're going to pay the rent if the queen of spades doesn't bail you out on the river.
It's very important to play within a budget you feel comfortable with. You'll be able to focus on the game rather than the financial implications.

Drinking alcohol while playing. You need to have all of your wits about you in order to make quality decisions at the table. It's no coincidence that casinos offer free alcohol to customers. Booze clouds your judgment and will have you making plays you wouldn't have considered making with a clearer head.

Quitting while you're ahead. Sorry to burst your bubble, but there is no system for figuring out when it's time to pack up and leave. The worst plan that many rookies utilize is the one where they hit and run by quitting after very small wins, but continue to play when they're behind. If anything, that's the exact opposite of what you should be doing.
When you're winning, you have a powerful table presence that you should exploit. When you're losing, that table image is tarnished and can have a negative effect on your confidence.

Playing in tough games. Beginners, some of who aren't even all that bad at poker, will often place themselves in games against competition they just can't handle. Rather than playing in smaller limit games, against opponents of comparable skill, they prefer to go head to head with the big boys. You can guess how that usually turns out.

Elevated ego. No, you're not as good as you think you are. In fact, you have a lot to learn. The day you realize that you know too little about poker is the day that you actually might start learning a thing or two. Know-it-alls generally know very little about what it takes to improve their poker game. It's very important to be objective about your skills and where you might need improvement.

Playing too many hands. Rookies play more hands than they should, not understanding the importance of starting with premium hands in premium situations.
Pick up a book or two before sitting down to play, and you'll understand why 9-3 is a bad hand to start with, whether it's suited or not. With all of the information out there today, there is no excuse for lacking fundamental poker knowledge.

Playing on tilt. Just like a pinball machine that gets banged too hard, a beginner will often short circuit when he loses a couple of bad hands in a row. A tilted player loses all faith in his game plan and will chase bad hands like inside straight draws, even though he knows he shouldn't.
Playing too many hours. Your brain just doesn't function well after 22 hours of sitting at the table.
Rather than getting some rest and coming back fresh the next day, most beginners end up playing too many hours trying to chase their money back. In the process, they end up throwing away even more.

Your mind plays tricks on you after so many hours, and you'll often convince yourself that you're playing well. Chances are, you're not.
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~~Shelynn~~

~~Shelynn~~

Legend
Very good advice and information on subject,all should read this;even those who have played for awhile. Thanks so much.
 
J

jpockets

Guest
Oh my God! Its like looking into a mirror and seeing every boil and sore! But seriously though good advice. I'm hoping that I'm slowly weeding out these bad habits. Another 50 years and I might actually be good. Also I'd recommend Harrington's books if no limit is your game. I think that they are better than any others I've read and that includes Super System 1 & 2.
 
Dragon 00769

Dragon 00769

Rising Star
good advice

thank you that is some good advice i will try to keep all of it in mind
good luck and have fun (when the game stop being fun it is time to get out)
 
1

12skin

Guest
Add chasing straights and flushes with unfavorable pot odds.

Also thinking you are entitled to a hand or "married to it". Just because you have AK does not mean you automatically win

Not taking into account position.

Also A9 does not = all in.
 
M

mparker333

Rising Star
very disapointing

i find that a lot of poker players are still rookies by the way they play so erratically AND bluff entirely too much.....
Rookie mistakes lead to disappointing gamesHere is my list of the top 10 mistakes rookie players make at the poker table. If you see yourself represented here, it's time to make some changes to your game.

Bluffing too much. Most rookies have watched too many Hollywood movies and have convinced themselves that poker is all about bluffing. Somehow, they think that if they just keep betting, everyone will get out of their way. That's unlikely, because a habitual bluffer is easily identified by his opponents early on.

Lack of patience. Playing poker means you'll go through long stretches of boring hands waiting for good cards. Rookies often don't have the patience to wait for quality cards, so, out of boredom, they start playing hands they know they shouldn't. Don't lose your patience, find it.

Playing unaffordable limits. Nothing is more detrimental to your confidence, and your bankroll, than gambling with money you can't afford to lose. You simply can't make smart decisions when you're also worrying about how you're going to pay the rent if the queen of spades doesn't bail you out on the river.
It's very important to play within a budget you feel comfortable with. You'll be able to focus on the game rather than the financial implications.

Drinking alcohol while playing. You need to have all of your wits about you in order to make quality decisions at the table. It's no coincidence that casinos offer free alcohol to customers. Booze clouds your judgment and will have you making plays you wouldn't have considered making with a clearer head.

Quitting while you're ahead. Sorry to burst your bubble, but there is no system for figuring out when it's time to pack up and leave. The worst plan that many rookies utilize is the one where they hit and run by quitting after very small wins, but continue to play when they're behind. If anything, that's the exact opposite of what you should be doing.
When you're winning, you have a powerful table presence that you should exploit. When you're losing, that table image is tarnished and can have a negative effect on your confidence.

Playing in tough games. Beginners, some of who aren't even all that bad at poker, will often place themselves in games against competition they just can't handle. Rather than playing in smaller limit games, against opponents of comparable skill, they prefer to go head to head with the big boys. You can guess how that usually turns out.

Elevated ego. No, you're not as good as you think you are. In fact, you have a lot to learn. The day you realize that you know too little about poker is the day that you actually might start learning a thing or two. Know-it-alls generally know very little about what it takes to improve their poker game. It's very important to be objective about your skills and where you might need improvement.

Playing too many hands. Rookies play more hands than they should, not understanding the importance of starting with premium hands in premium situations.
Pick up a book or two before sitting down to play, and you'll understand why 9-3 is a bad hand to start with, whether it's suited or not. With all of the information out there today, there is no excuse for lacking fundamental poker knowledge.

Playing on tilt. Just like a pinball machine that gets banged too hard, a beginner will often short circuit when he loses a couple of bad hands in a row. A tilted player loses all faith in his game plan and will chase bad hands like inside straight draws, even though he knows he shouldn't.
Playing too many hours. Your brain just doesn't function well after 22 hours of sitting at the table.
Rather than getting some rest and coming back fresh the next day, most beginners end up playing too many hours trying to chase their money back. In the process, they end up throwing away even more.

Your mind plays tricks on you after so many hours, and you'll often convince yourself that you're playing well. Chances are, you're not.[/quote]
 
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