How do you get opponents equity if you are not sure of the opponent's range?

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zyntsz

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How do you get opponents equity if you are not sure of the opponent's range? Do you just guess and put it or is there some basic odds?
 
Nafor

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Putting your opponent into a range is always more or less of a guess work. If you truly don't know anything about your opponent then no - it is quite impossible to put him on a range.

This is why HUDs and their stats are so useful. They give you insight how your opponents acts. If you are not using a HUD then you should just keep your eyes open and make notes - okay, you should do that even if you have a HUD :icon_thum
 
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tomk7788

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Take your equity early in the hand.
 
Alizona

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In my opinion, you have realized the hardest part of poker - how do we accurately put our opponents on a proper range? For me, the answer is "observation". That's how we do it. We must observe our opponents play closely, and at every opportunity we get to see their cards at showdown, this is another clue to help us determine their probable range... but as you can probably already realize, this process can take months if not years, and for a tournament player like me, we rarely see the same players over and over again, meaning we might never be able to understand opponent's ranges.

Of course, the HUD and hand history database is critical here... but I don't even run one of those. I am therefore at a HUGE disadvantage in terms of that critical "observation" technique, because I have to do all the remembering in my head, and that's almost impossible if you only see the player at your table once per month or year.

The final method, and the one I use for simplicity, is to just use a "typical range" and ignore the fact that each player is going to have a different range. I often will use my own ranges for my opponent since I feel I am an average, competent player, I'm not a maniac and not TOO much of a nit (lol). And then I observe at the tables and very rarely I will make a range adjustment in my head if I do encounter an obvious maniac or obvious nit/rock. But since I don't run any analysis software while I play, including the all-important HUD, I am basically just flying by the seat of my pants. The equity calculator stuff and hand reviews are obviously done much later, and I really don't do as much of that as I probably should.

That's my take on it, you've raised a very good question and I will enjoy reading other players' answers.
 
mina271

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I'm kind of confused why should you try to take the equity from your opponent that you can't even assess? Clearly we can say you have to observe and take notes, but then it's no longer about someone you can't assess, but someone you have learned to read. If you want to try yourself on someone you cannot assess then you should be very careful first. The tide can always turn and then in the end the opponent has your equity instead of you with that of the opponent. you should maybe also look to play with players who are roughly within your own range
 
henriquemaduro

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How do you get opponents equity if you are not sure of the opponent's range? Do you just guess and put it or is there some basic odds?



Yes, its a guessing game, but if you spend a lot of time playing at the same time with the same people, u can watch, learn and take notes that will make a better range.
 
Luvepoker

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You will never know the exact equity they have but you can make a educated guess when you do. Take a tight player who hardly plays. He suddenly raises and you call and hit a set. The run out to the turn is 2 4 5 6 no flush. Are you worried about him having straight? Would he really have a 3 here? This is where you can figure out the equity they could have. Lets say he only raises 3 or 4 % of hands. What would he have. Even more he was under the gun. You put him n Aces to jacks and AK and AQ. you have the set of 6's His equity is very likely very small. Lets say he bet the flop and turn. He is tight so he is betting what, the aces to jacks. His estimated equity if your not folding is for 2 outs or about 4%.

While this is a easy and simple example you just need to remember its never exact and always an guesstimate.
 
takinitSLEAZEE

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Assessing a players' equity can be achieved by betting to see where the villains are at, hand wise, and work the board if possible. I believe there are some posts in the strategy threads that can be helpful.
 
AKQ

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its called a polarized range
he either has aj+ 88+
or 45s j8s crap

using line logic you can begin to deduce which of a players gear they are on
 
AKQ

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just as equity is important for you
an opponents fold equity is just as important
 
Jogo4

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who pays a lot, receives nothing, what is with you is safe, equity is in the form of playing it safe.
 
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zipocool

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How do you get opponents equity if you are not sure of the opponent's range? Do you just guess and put it or is there some basic odds?
well, in order to fully realize the equity, you must have a fairly clear idea of ​​​​the opponent’s range and with what he can pay your bets
 
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Danieleli

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hi there!!
This is a very good question and made me think to give you the answer! I believe that having knowledge of the GTO is very important and you can find a lot of charts with that info that will help you build ranges.

After you understand that you'll need to adapt your strategy based on the spot and player you are playing.

I dont have an great ideia of equity in a lot of spots but i try to give a look on some things during the game like bet sizes and actions and if i have chances to improve my game.

There are some free softwares where you can do equity calculations and are really great tools.

When in preflop situations generally the ranges on early positions are tight and every position that changes you can enter some new combos.
 
siberianspecial

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I respect hands by position a lot, I think the best way to control this issue, it may seem strange, but I can work a lot using this tactic.
 
044hero

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No matter how good you are at guessing games, there will always be a space for surprise ;)
 
peaceofcoke

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There is a book called The Black Swan, a good read that dives into the realms of probabilities and statistics in a critical way, and the ways to avoid the unexpected. This said, to avoid any unpleasant surprise, one must read the board first, and the story behind it, and calculate the board equity rather than the opponent range, because sometimes the tightest players gamble, it suffices that they run card dead for 20 hands then they will play the most bizarre hands
 
Alex70793

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If you play with this player for a long time, at least 3-4 hours at the table, then you can trace his manner of play and on the basis of this draw some conclusions about his game.
If you don't have any information about the opponent at the poker table, then you need to draw conclusions by instinct or intuition, like that)).
 
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tomk7788

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You can figure out his range by his preflop and post flop actions. As an example, if his VIP is 80% and his PFR is 2% he's generally weak and will be weak post flop unless he has something big. If he starts betting the farm post flop then fold. Check his Went to SD stats, if he goes to showdown a lot which he probably does he's a calling station so bet every street if you have medium and top pairs.
 
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