The Power of Position (Day 1 Course Discussion)

Debi

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Today's course topic is about The Power of Position. We have had numerous threads in the forum asking about how important position really is. Now that you have completed Day 1 you know - it is everything.

If you have not yet read Day 1 and watched the video for Day 1 - take a few minutes now to do that and then come back here to discuss it:

The Power of Position

If you have any questions about the different positions on a table, playing hands from each position, or about any of the hands discussed in Day 1 of the ebook or the Day 1 video - this is the place to ask them!

Both Collin and Katie will be available to assist you as well as other members of the CardsChat community.

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onecardsteve

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I like Day 1 , I use the 10 Player Table EP as SB, BB, UTG, and UTG+1, Middle Position as seats 5,6 and 7 , Late Position as HJ CO and Button.
9 Player table ; SB, BB, UTG, MP ,as UTG+1, seats 5and 6, LP as HJ, CO, and Button.
 
Debi

Debi

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I like Day 1 , I use the 10 Player Table EP as SB, BB, UTG, and UTG+1, Middle Position as seats 5,6 and 7 , Late Position as HJ CO and Button.
9 Player table ; SB, BB, UTG, MP ,as UTG+1, seats 5and 6, LP as HJ, CO, and Button.

Yea I have seen that it can vary depending on who is labeling them even with 9 players.

Glad you enjoyed chapter 1 - hope you are going to continue with the rest of them!
 
Luvart

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I just finished the Day #1.

Very interesting course. I've completely forgotten to concept of "Relative Position", and it's really very useful in some situations.

Tomorrow with the Day #2.
 
MattRyder

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Katie's excitement about the term LoJack got me to wondering. There must be some colorful history behind it. Anybody able to share some light? Katie perhaps?
 
Debi

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I just finished the Day #1.

Very interesting course. I've completely forgotten to concept of "Relative Position", and it's really very useful in some situations.

Tomorrow with the Day #2.

Awesome!

Katie's excitement about the term LoJack got me to wondering. There must be some colorful history behind it. Anybody able to share some light? Katie perhaps?

She might be able to shed some light on that!
 
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Hi Collin and Katie!

Thanks for the video.

However, I have a question which sometimes troubled me.

When we are on button or CO position and before us someone on UTG or UTG+1 raises with 3BB+, what should we do when we doesn't have best starting hand? Let's assume it's K10o or Q10o.

I'm asking because in every course it says about late position being looser. And sometimes I met people who raise in early position with premium hands and sometimes maniac who does not have anything.

FYI, I am still on NL2.
 
Collin Moshman

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Happy to see we already have members who are through day 1% already!

MattRyder, that's a great question. I'll ask Katie but my guess is that:

Hijack is called that because you're "hijacking" the ability to open the pot away from the later position button and cutoff. So then "lojack" is just a fun variation on that going from high to low. I really like that term too, Katie taught it to me initially!
 
Collin Moshman

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Wizcup, You should generally fold almost any offsuit broadway hand in late position facing an early position raise. Against a very loose opponent, calling with KQo would be reasonable. But as a rule of thumb, you should fold there because you're too easily dominated and these hands don't play as well as the suited broadway hands.

We'll go into a lot more detail on this in future days of the course too :)
 
KristaK

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hi hi everyone :ciao:
i obtain the book: "Winning Poker Player on 30 Days"
i just start it it excellent!!!
i excited now... everyone watch me in 30 days... hummm in may 20 i going to start winning! lol

highly recommend this book, it on amazon, if you have kindle unlimted no costs

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Katie Dozier

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Katie's excitement about the term LoJack got me to wondering. There must be some colorful history behind it. Anybody able to share some light? Katie perhaps?

Hahaha I am amused by using it as though it’s as common as saying hijack when it’s not of course lol. The LoJack always struck me as a celebrity couple type name—back when the trend was to combine every Hollywood couple’s names into one [emoji38]
 
MattRyder

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Wizcup, You should generally fold almost any offsuit broadway hand in late position facing an early position raise. Against a very loose opponent, calling with KQo would be reasonable. But as a rule of thumb, you should fold there because you're too easily dominated and these hands don't play as well as the suited broadway hands.

We'll go into a lot more detail on this in future days of the course too :)
Hey Collin - why do suited hands play better than non-suited ones? A simple 88 v KQ pre-flop flip only gives the KQs a 3% edge over the KQo hand. A3 v 88 - the A3s has a 4% advantage over A3o. There is a difference, but is 3 - 4% enough to make a suited hand worth playing when the non-suited variant isn't?
 
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tagece

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Well, it's lesson number one and I've already learned valuable things. This relative position topic is very interesting.
One question:
If you have a player in SB or BB who always defends his blinds aggressively, what is the best strategy for play from late position?
 
I Live Poker

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answer question lecture 1

Blinds 100/200 the hero receives T9o from the big blind, is raised 440 from the cotoff, the button limps, then the hero only completes to see the flop.
Flop: heroe check, Cotoff: bet 648, reraise button 3564 and heroe folds.
 
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leleo93

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learning because the last one to speak, is a huge advantage. it is very important to be aware of the position:cool::D
 
marvinsytan

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day 1 - eBook and video done

relative position first time to hear this one

interesting :flute:

thank you to all appreciate the book and video
 
giraug

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Just finished day 1 course!

A bit late, just before starting to read it I went all in from UTG+1, with a not so strong hand... a KK called and I was out of the game.

If I had read the chapter 1 before, I wou.d have waited to be on a better position.

1st lesson learned! lol
 
Collin Moshman

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Hey Collin - why do suited hands play better than non-suited ones? A simple 88 v KQ pre-flop flip only gives the KQs a 3% edge over the KQo hand. A3 v 88 - the A3s has a 4% advantage over A3o. There is a difference, but is 3 - 4% enough to make a suited hand worth playing when the non-suited variant isn't?

Good question! In general, we're not only looking for good hands in terms of pre-flop all-ins percentages. The extra few percent is definitely important, but the suitedness has a bigger impact than that, particularly when stacks are deep.

It allows you to have more profitable spots to float with backdoor draws, semi-bluff the flop or turn, and otherwise be able to contest pots more often post-flop.
 
Collin Moshman

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Well, it's lesson number one and I've already learned valuable things. This relative position topic is very interesting.
One question:
If you have a player in SB or BB who always defends his blinds aggressively, what is the best strategy for play from late position?

Thanks!

To answer your quetion: Attack the blinds more often when they fold more, and don't be as aggressive if they're always defending. But you don't have to tighten up a lot. Position is very powerful, so if you have a hand like 97s on the button and stacks are deep, you can raise that hand even if both blinds are usually defending a lot.
 
tagece

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Thanks!

To answer your quetion: Attack the blinds more often when they fold more, and don't be as aggressive if they're always defending. But you don't have to tighten up a lot. Position is very powerful, so if you have a hand like 97s on the button and stacks are deep, you can raise that hand even if both blinds are usually defending a lot.

Thank you for your answer, Collin.
 
Polytarp

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Regarding position, say I'm joining a live $1-$2 NLH game at 2 am at Bally's in LV because I can't sleep. I see there are only two games going, some players are drunk (but seem sharp) and have the largest chip stacks, there are several women at the tables, some people look frazzled (like myself) .. some have Gucci shoes .. some have sandals and there are 2 spots open at one table and one spot at another.
How much should I buy-in for, should I wait for the button or should I just jump right in and what should I look for to choose the right table to play at assuming I'll stay for about two hours? Based on your experience(s) what should I win/lose (proportional to my buy-in) after two hours ...and would you change tables if you were losing? Now, what would both of you do if you were in my shoes/sandals/socks...never barefoot though!

[This kind of scenario happened and the table I chose had a prior year wsop "in the money" player and several internationally ranked chess players (who also couldn't sleep..Alex Katz was one). I did win some money after two hours when it became a one table game after our table broke up.]
 
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jeanpierre1279

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I am very happy to be learning on this high level poker course at no extra cost. I mean that the teachers are very good and with a high level of humor, which makes learning a lot easier (at least I like it: P). I am excited for the next chapters.
 
Katie Dozier

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I am very happy to be learning on this high level poker course at no extra cost. I mean that the teachers are very good and with a high level of humor, which makes learning a lot easier (at least I like it: P). I am excited for the next chapters.


Aw thanks, best of luck! :)
 
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