How to play suited connectors?

OzExorcist

OzExorcist

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Been doing some thinking lately, and I've decided there's one particular group of hands that's got me stumped - suited connectors.

I'm just never quite sure what I'm supposed to do with them. They don't feel like strong raising hands to me, so most of the time I end up just throwing them away unless I'm getting really good odds to stick around. It's a safe option, I guess, but I feel like maybe I'm missing out on some opportunities.

Here's what I'm wondering, any advice would be appreciated:

- What's a really good flop for a suited connector hand? Take a typical one like 8c9c. If there's three clubs on the flop I've made a flush, but do I have the best flush? What if another one comes on the turn? Or are we really hoping to end up with the top end of a straight, or straight and flush draws to maximise outs?

- Should they be played like low pocket pairs? eg: try to see a cheap flop, bet out if you hit and toss them if you don't? Or do we raise with them, and assume that the types of flops that hit us will be the kinds that don't hit the hands that will be calling us?

- I'm assuming they'd need to be played fairly fast - true or not? The way I figure it, they'd be vulnerable to higher draws if the hand was allowed to go to the river, so is it often best to bet hard on the flop in the hope of taking it down early?

I should mention I'm thinking more the jack and below type connectors - I've got a slightly better idea what to do with the premium ones (AKs, KQs, etc)
 
XXIII

XXIII

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I'd still fold them. Suited connectors are ok. But if you get the flush draw its more likely somone has a bigger flush draw. Well unless the suited connectors are something like A2 or so. Bt you are more likely not going to make much more playing those hands. They look good on TV but thats 1 out of about 1000 hands during the day that they actually show.

Oh and if you must play them think of it this way: good enough to play, good enough to raise.
 
KyleJRM

KyleJRM

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Sep 9, 2007
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Been doing some thinking lately, and I've decided there's one particular group of hands that's got me stumped - suited connectors.

I'm just never quite sure what I'm supposed to do with them. They don't feel like strong raising hands to me, so most of the time I end up just throwing them away unless I'm getting really good odds to stick around. It's a safe option, I guess, but I feel like maybe I'm missing out on some opportunities.

Here's what I'm wondering, any advice would be appreciated:

- What's a really good flop for a suited connector hand? Take a typical one like 8c9c. If there's three clubs on the flop I've made a flush, but do I have the best flush? What if another one comes on the turn? Or are we really hoping to end up with the top end of a straight, or straight and flush draws to maximise outs?

- Should they be played like low pocket pairs? eg: try to see a cheap flop, bet out if you hit and toss them if you don't? Or do we raise with them, and assume that the types of flops that hit us will be the kinds that don't hit the hands that will be calling us?

- I'm assuming they'd need to be played fairly fast - true or not? The way I figure it, they'd be vulnerable to higher draws if the hand was allowed to go to the river, so is it often best to bet hard on the flop in the hope of taking it down early?

I should mention I'm thinking more the jack and below type connectors - I've got a slightly better idea what to do with the premium ones (AKs, KQs, etc)

You want to hit a monster (or at least a monster draw) and you want to be across from a player you are fairly certain will pay you off if you hit it and has the chips to do so.

If you flop the flush or straight without a different flush on the board, I think it is safe to assume you have the best hand at that point. If you don't, you better have amazing confidence in your hand-reading skills to lay it down.

If you flop a flush or straight draw, play your pot odds. If you flop both flush and straight draws, I'd play as if I'm ahead in the hand (though better players may have better advice there, I'm not 100% sure on that one).

If you don't flop at *least* two pair or a big draw, throw them away.
 
hunterT1000

hunterT1000

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Sep 3, 2007
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Ye I think the important point with suited connectors is to remember why you played them in the first place... to hit big. If you dont hit big throw em away. (pretty much whats been said above). When you do hit the nut str8 there aren't many players who will put you on that hand so you'll often get paid off by two pair or even tptk
 
HartAttack3

HartAttack3

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Mar 12, 2007
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i LOVE suited connectors. Think about it, what are the hands that we always talk about being the ones the "donks" use to beat us? Its the suited connectors like 67 89 j10 (albeit I love j-10). If we can play them correctly we can make mucho dinero, but thats the big thing, you have to play them right and dont chase unless u hit a great draw. I will most of the time gladly gamble with connectors if I dont have to pay too much. Granted I play limit which is a totally different game but in tournies and NL I would almost always gamble with them if I know the opponent has high cards preflop.

You just need to remember that you are playing them usually against a high ace or another better hand and if the player acts like he hit then believe him unless u get a good draw or hit the flush. You will call money away with these because they dont hit all the time but you will more than make up for it when you do crack those aces or kings.

I am positive many people would disagree with me here but Im just giving my opinion, would be interesting to see what everyone else thinks though, good post.
 
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