The all in reraise preflop bluff.

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Bentheman87

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It seems like a lot of players make this play especially in the end of a tournament. And it seems like a good move since the player will win the small blind and big blind and maybe 3 or 4 more big blinds. I don't make this play very often, probably the only time I'll do it is on the bubble of a SNG when I'm the big stack, they will fold almost every time rather than calling and risk going out in 4th place. But say it's late in a MTT, what kind of things should I look for before I make this play? For example, what should my M be if I were to make this move? I see many players making a huge blunder of making this move when their M is below 5, even if the original raiser only raised 2x BB, they have to call with any two cards because of the pot odds.
 
Steveg1976

Steveg1976

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Being the First one all in is almost if not more important than position. Harrington Wrote a lot about low M play and he does it much better than I. To sum it up though, if the table is loose or tight changes the cards you should shove with, be the first one in, and don't wait to long to make the shove or else you will be no better off even if you do double up. with an M of say 2-3 doubling only gives you 4-6 and that is IF you are called and win.
 
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switch0723

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there isnt much need to re raise all in on a bluff late in a tourny unless your shortstacked. You just need to pick your spots and raise the shortstacks. Dont think you need to make big tourny risking plays just to steal blinds. Just sensible play is better in the long run
 
WVHillbilly

WVHillbilly

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Actually, I've been reading Kill Everyone over the last few days and it's authors argue that if you're the big stack at the table and the tourney is near the bubble you should be pushing (sometimes as much as 100% of the time against other big or medium stacks) when you are the first one in. They have very complex mathematical models to suggest when and how often to push based on your stack size and the sizes of the stacks left to act. Basically it boils down to when your near or at the bubble big stacks should attack medium and other big stacks who are afraid (or should be) of being knocked out when there are other short stacks left at the table. They actually argue that it may be right to fold AA to a shove from the short stack in certain situations (to either keep him around while you accumulate chips from the medium and large stacks or because your equity is so high you're not getting the odds to call when you calculate them using your bubble factor). It's a fairly interesting read and most of the concepts were very foreign to me.
 
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switch0723

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i dont agree with the first part about pushing all the time on bubble as big stack. Sicne if you are called, you can make a big dent into your chances of winning tourny. I think you can just afford to make 3 bets each hand, allowing you to build a bigger chip stack without being at too much risk.

I have heard of the second part though about not calling the all in of shortstacks just so that you can build your stack to an even larger amount. Not something i would do though, id rather take the chips
 
WVHillbilly

WVHillbilly

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I'm not saying that I would go all-in all of the time with a big stack (and they certainly don't advocate it in the real world) but the authors do suggest that if everyone played perfectly you could go all in with 72 show your cards to a player with AA and he'd still be making a mistake to call you in certain situations.

Playing like a maniac is not the main thrust of the book just some extreme examples that they give to get to their underlying theories.
 
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