Tilt, loss of bankroll

AllinIgor

AllinIgor

Rock Star
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Total posts
205
Gentlemen, some beginners have a huge problem with bankroll management, perhaps many players have, not only beginners as I quoted. That really is a big problem. Lately I've heard a report from a friend who made a $50 deposit in a certain poker room.
He visited some forums, read some articles and felt ready to start playing.
He opened an NL hold'em 0.01/0.02 cash game table and spent a few hours playing by that limit, however, he found it a waste of time to stay for more than 2 hours at a table to win $2.
So he went to try to play MTT tournaments of values of $1.10/2.20 played around 6 to 8 tournaments, and never came close to ITM, then went on to play Sit&Go of 0.25/0.50, in which he got a third place, however he still found very little, spending many hours playing to win so "little".
To finish, he started playing cash game $0.25/0.50 with the $30 he had left, soon in the first hands came AK and he increased to 2.50 and the opponent paid. Flop: Q2J, the villain bet $10 and he paid. On the turn came the T completing his sequel, and the villain bet $22, and he went all in. On the river hit another Q completing the full house for the villain and he lost all his bankroll.
What is the moral of the story in your opinion?
In my humble opinion we should draw several lessons from this story I have told you:
If we have a small bankroll, we have to be patient in playing the limits that are appropriate to this bankroll, not in a hurry to push down the boundaries. Poker requires study, discipline, and having above all emotional control.
In your opinion, what is needed to have good bankroll management, and beyond what I quoted, what else would you say about the post?
First of all thanks for the comments, until after!
 
bablovod

bablovod

stupid parody of the game
Loyaler
Joined
May 31, 2017
Total posts
3,268
Awards
13
Gentlemen, some beginners have a huge problem with bankroll management, perhaps many players have, not only beginners as I quoted. That really is a big problem. Lately I've heard a report from a friend who made a $50 deposit in a certain poker room.
He visited some forums, read some articles and felt ready to start playing.
He opened an NL hold'em 0.01/0.02 cash game table and spent a few hours playing by that limit, however, he found it a waste of time to stay for more than 2 hours at a table to win $2.
So he went to try to play MTT tournaments of values of $1.10/2.20 played around 6 to 8 tournaments, and never came close to ITM, then went on to play Sit&Go of 0.25/0.50, in which he got a third place, however he still found very little, spending many hours playing to win so "little".
To finish, he started playing cash game $0.25/0.50 with the $30 he had left, soon in the first hands came AK and he increased to 2.50 and the opponent paid. Flop: Q2J, the villain bet $10 and he paid. On the turn came the T completing his sequel, and the villain bet $22, and he went all in. On the river hit another Q completing the full house for the villain and he lost all his bankroll.
What is the moral of the story in your opinion?
In my humble opinion we should draw several lessons from this story I have told you:
If we have a small bankroll, we have to be patient in playing the limits that are appropriate to this bankroll, not in a hurry to push down the boundaries. Poker requires study, discipline, and having above all emotional control.
In your opinion, what is needed to have good bankroll management, and beyond what I quoted, what else would you say about the post?
First of all thanks for the comments, until after!



hi!
maybe it was the variance that prevented it, it's too damn big.
on the other hand, each limit is polished for many months, until it starts to make a profit. but even this does not guarantee that when the limit is increased, the profit will remain.
P.S. thousands of articles have been written about bankroll management and told in video clips of professionals. I don't see the point in retelling it.
good luck at the tables, you and your friend!:)
 
AllinIgor

AllinIgor

Rock Star
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Total posts
205
Bro, I believe I posted this in the right place, discussions for beginners. I already know that this has already been discussed by several professionals, there are videos, and other things related to the subject, however, I believe that here is a site where countless people are starting the game, comes the search for knowledge and stories about played hands, and how to behave and not behave in front of them, this is just a report that maybe other people will see, and not make the same mistake, if there is no need for you this article, great, you must already be experienced in the game, you should not make mistakes for beginners anymore. But if you try to read, in all places of the forum, the themes are the same discussed for more than 10 years. And will you also say in all these articles that there is no need to discuss them? Anyway, I wish you good luck, in life and at the tables!
[emoji1666]
hi!
maybe it was the variance that prevented it, it's too damn big.
on the other hand, each limit is polished for many months, until it starts to make a profit. but even this does not guarantee that when the limit is increased, the profit will remain.
P.S. thousands of articles have been written about bankroll management and told in video clips of professionals. I don't see the point in retelling it.
good luck at the tables, you and your friend!:)
 
Evan Jarvis

Evan Jarvis

Legend
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Total posts
1,935
Awards
4
Gentlemen, some beginners have a huge problem with bankroll management, perhaps many players have, not only beginners as I quoted. That really is a big problem. Lately I've heard a report from a friend who made a $50 deposit in a certain poker room.
He visited some forums, read some articles and felt ready to start playing.
He opened an NL hold'em 0.01/0.02 cash game table and spent a few hours playing by that limit, however, he found it a waste of time to stay for more than 2 hours at a table to win $2.
So he went to try to play MTT tournaments of values of $1.10/2.20 played around 6 to 8 tournaments, and never came close to ITM, then went on to play Sit&Go of 0.25/0.50, in which he got a third place, however he still found very little, spending many hours playing to win so "little".
To finish, he started playing cash game $0.25/0.50 with the $30 he had left, soon in the first hands came AK and he increased to 2.50 and the opponent paid. Flop: Q2J, the villain bet $10 and he paid. On the turn came the T completing his sequel, and the villain bet $22, and he went all in. On the river hit another Q completing the full house for the villain and he lost all his bankroll.
What is the moral of the story in your opinion?
In my humble opinion we should draw several lessons from this story I have told you:
If we have a small bankroll, we have to be patient in playing the limits that are appropriate to this bankroll, not in a hurry to push down the boundaries. Poker requires study, discipline, and having above all emotional control.
In your opinion, what is needed to have good bankroll management, and beyond what I quoted, what else would you say about the post?
First of all thanks for the comments, until after!

Thank you for asking these questions. I have a few videos that I hope may help you!!!




It's true that with a smaller bankroll it makes more sense to go for it and try and build up the bankroll. Once a reasonable roll is in place though a strategy of slow steady building and protecting it makes the most sense.

Concentrating/Taking chances is a great way to get rich. But diversifying (playing with smaller parts of your bankroll) is the way to stay rich.

Hope that helps!
 
AllinIgor

AllinIgor

Rock Star
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Total posts
205
Thanks bro!
Thank you for asking these questions. I have a few videos that I hope may help you!!!




It's true that with a smaller bankroll it makes more sense to go for it and try and build up the bankroll. Once a reasonable roll is in place though a strategy of slow steady building and protecting it makes the most sense.

Concentrating/Taking chances is a great way to get rich. But diversifying (playing with smaller parts of your bankroll) is the way to stay rich.

Hope that helps!
 
R

ROYALROAD

Visionary
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Total posts
598
Awards
1
Please be accustomed to a card's favorable to an enemy going out and losing by the 4th and the 5th.

If a poker is such one, please know.
 
Einer777

Einer777

Rock Star
Joined
Jun 10, 2008
Total posts
145
It never hurts to remember bad bank management and not having a way to study and exploit
 
F

fundiver199

Legend
Loyaler
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Total posts
10,295
Awards
1
The problem for many people is, they lack patience and expect instant results. This is true in poker, but also in many other areas of life. Now your friend does have a point, that its sort of waste of time to spend hours winning 2$ at 2NL. However we need to see it as training. And if we want to start higher, we need to be much more realistic about, how much money we have to deposit and be ready to probably lose to better opponents, until we have learned and improved our own game.

What your friend did was just gambling. And while its not the end of the world to lose 50$ on gambling, this is not, how you become a winning poker player. He might as well have gone in the casino section and lost it all in blackjack. Or put it on his favourite sports team winning their next match.
 
Daddysprincess99

Daddysprincess99

Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Total posts
58
I think there is a difference between casual gamblers with bankroll issues and beginners who are losing their bankrolls to try and learn and improve. Hopefully, those trying to learn will also learn to manage their bankroll so they can afford to get better. For people just trying to have fun maybe just play what they can afford so they can play more.
 
Related Full Tilt Reviews: English - Dutch - German - Spanish - Portuguese - FT Casino - Full Tilt Poker Mobile Bankroll Building - Bankroll Management
Top