SnG, postflop aggressor behind.

killing_random

killing_random

Rock Star
Joined
Mar 3, 2021
Total posts
351
Almost every time you desided to op-raise, you've got flatcalled, completely miss a flop with your super elite range hand over and over again and then playing out of position against pot size bets, having 6-3 outs to a measly top pair.
But that's not the problem, that was just the description. My problem is that I compleatly unable to read his hand. The range I know: Ax, Kx, 22+, JT+, any suited somewhat connector, and that won't help me one bit. Whatever board come out, he can catch any of these streets. Even top pair top kicker seems marginal on a dry board, cos he can have top pair too + his shitty kicker hit one of others four low cards with probability ~4/9 respectively.
Also I don't feel any reaction from him to my actions: you bet? - ok, call; you check - ok, then I'll bet. So, no pot & villain control whatsoever.
I was thinking about resolution of this and I'm not a big fan of passive fit-or-fold approach with no control of anything. Losing one after another my open-bets+antes make me thinner and thinner while he's become fatter and fatter. Limping to reduce losses is easily exploitative. Other players also try to bust him with stronger range but only make it worse, double him up when he run them over ofcouse. Even if he lose some of these all-ins, he is already to big to care. Just outsit him is not really an option in such case.
So, for now I come up with idea to tight up my range at post-middle positions, then just skip standard op-raising and go straight to 3bet size raise with the relevant hands, specially against him. I demand my control over a villain and clear hints through pressure, the earlier the better.
Idk if anybody practice something like this for real before and I don't expect a safe solution, I know that you can't deal with this type of villains without some gambling.

Your thoughts?
 
spectralwave

spectralwave

Rock Star
Joined
Mar 12, 2020
Total posts
374
1 - People game 2 - Stack game (always in big blinds) To play well post-flop is to play well with stacks above 50 bbs: hands with great potential to reach the river. You lose more chips and more money when you make mistakes on the turn and, especially, on the river.

The 4 principles of profitability Play in position Be the aggressor Play against weaker opponents The equity of your hand

1. Playing in position Exercise the advantage of playing after opponents. When you have value, you earn an average of 50% more chips. When you have the worst hand, you lose 50% less chips. You realize the equity of your hand. You increase bluff profit by up to 5x. It is much more important in deep stack games.

2. Be the aggressor Most of the time your opponent does not hit the board. And sometimes he has value, you make him fold the best bluffing hand. Scenario 1: You have a better game than your opponent. Scenario 2: the two of you didn't get anything right ... whoever the aggressor is, will win the hand. Scenario 3: You have nothing and you can make him fold the best hand. Scenario 4: You have a game and it has nothing. Encourage him to bluff!


3. Play against weaker opponents This is the big secret of poker! For you to be profitable, just play against opponents worse than you! The more deep stacks you are playing, the more you have to worry about attracting the fish to the hand. When you have big games like trips, straight and flush and full house, you will extract a lot of chips from the weak player and a few chips from the professional. And when the opposite happens, the professional will be able to take a lot more chips from you than the fish.



4. Equity The strength of your hand in relation to the opponent. Since you will never know exactly what his hand is, you will analyze the relative strength of your hand against the range of hands that your opponent may have. Always try to assert your equity and try to steal your opponent. It is always related to how much you need to invest to win your opponent's pot and stack. Excellent for bluffing with equity, since even if the opponent calls, our hand can still win.


FLOP C-bet: when the pre-flop aggressor continues to bet on the flop. It is very profitable because most of the time the bluff will pass. And the reverse? When your opponent c-beta and you fold, he is profiting on you. So we must react to the c-bet according to these 6 variables: Percentage of your opponent's c-bet. Your opponent's range versus the range he perceives from you. The size of the bet he made in relation to the pot. The effective stack of the hand. Percentage of his c-bet turn. How he reacts when he raises his c-bet.

When to c-bet? To find out, you need to ask yourself these 10 questions: What is the profile of the opponents? What is my equity against the opponent's range? Do I need to protect this equity? Can I bet for value and call winning? Can I bluff that hand? Do I have a position? Am I the aggressor of the hand? Does this flop hit my range more or that of the villain? How many players am I playing against? What is the effective stack in that hand?
TURN AND RIVER
The range that has come this far is much stronger. Did the turn / river change the board or is it a blank? Does the turn / river favor my range more or my opponent's? Does it make any sense for me to bet on the turn, whether for bluff or value? What is the relationship of the pot to the effective stack of the hand? Can I get more chips by betting for value or should I let him bluff? Is it worth it for me to bluff here? Analysis of ranges, effective stack and your profile and that of your opponent.
 
J

Jrobbz10

Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 10, 2021
Total posts
39
Almost every time you desided to op-raise, you've got flatcalled, completely miss a flop with your super elite range hand over and over again and then playing out of position against pot size bets, having 6-3 outs to a measly top pair.
But that's not the problem, that was just the description. My problem is that I compleatly unable to read his hand. The range I know: Ax, Kx, 22+, JT+, any suited somewhat connector, and that won't help me one bit. Whatever board come out, he can catch any of these streets. Even top pair top kicker seems marginal on a dry board, cos he can have top pair too + his shitty kicker hit one of others four low cards with probability ~4/9 respectively.
Also I don't feel any reaction from him to my actions: you bet? - ok, call; you check - ok, then I'll bet. So, no pot & villain control whatsoever.
I was thinking about resolution of this and I'm not a big fan of passive fit-or-fold approach with no control of anything. Losing one after another my open-bets+antes make me thinner and thinner while he's become fatter and fatter. Limping to reduce losses is easily exploitative. Other players also try to bust him with stronger range but only make it worse, double him up when he run them over ofcouse. Even if he lose some of these all-ins, he is already to big to care. Just outsit him is not really an option in such case.
So, for now I come up with idea to tight up my range at post-middle positions, then just skip standard op-raising and go straight to 3bet size raise with the relevant hands, specially against him. I demand my control over a villain and clear hints through pressure, the earlier the better.
Idk if anybody practice something like this for real before and I don't expect a safe solution, I know that you can't deal with this type of villains without some gambling.

Your thoughts?

I play against calling stations all the time. What I find is that many of them will pick up the fact that I check when I didn't hit the flop or turn or I'll C-bet both streets then check on the river. That makes me easily exploitable. Most of the people who exploit me when I do this usually have something to show up at showdown with whether it be middle pair or just a missed draw. I have found a lot of luck with 3-betting these types of opponents. However, sometimes I do have to go to showdown with them just to see what cards they are playing. A lot of times the know I will fold to aggression so they keep their foot on the gas, or if they believe I might have a draw the may over bet me just to get me out of the hand. To answer you question, essentially yea you have to gamble a bit but that doesn't mean you have to deviate from GTO strategy. Flush draws and straight draws both hit about 20% of the time so if you don't think he will make you shove it's definitely worth taking it to the river. And yea I think tightening up here is the only way to go unless he is flat calling preflop raises or even limping every time.
 
F

fundiver199

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Having a very loose player on your direct left is an unfavourable situation, and in cash games this is often the seat, which people will leave, and which you might therefore get offered, if you are on a waiting list. And frankly when you figure out, that this is, what happened, you should probably leave as well.

In tournaments you have to accept, what you got, and if you find yourself having the most active player on your direct left, and maybe even with a big stack, you cant really do anything other than nit up and hope, that the situation change. In an MTT one of you might get moved to another table, and in a STT the action player might donk off his stack to someone on his left. And basically your goal is to maintain as much of your stack, until this happen, or until you have a hand, which is strong enough to get to showdown.
 
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