Feel like I’m stuck

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Murph1969

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I feel like I’m at beginner level and can’t get any better. I’ve read books and taken numerous courses (including this one) and don’t feel like I’ve learned ANYTHING! There’s just information overload and it seems like the answer to every question is, “it depends.” Help me get better.
 
Proxima_Midnight

Proxima_Midnight

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I feel like I’m at beginner level and can’t get any better. I’ve read books and taken numerous courses (including this one) and don’t feel like I’ve learned ANYTHING! There’s just information overload and it seems like the answer to every question is, “it depends.” Help me get better.
I don't know what books you've read or what courses you've taken, but my suggestion would be to go through them again if you feel like you haven't learned anything. It's also important that you know how to apply what you've learned as that's part of the process. Learning/understanding is one thing, doing is another.

I don't know what questions you've asked but if you're getting 'it depends' responses, then you're probably asking very generic questions. Poker is a game of information, for detail replies, you need to provide as much detail to your question as you can get. If you want better replies, ask better questions.
 
black and

black and

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It all depends on you and your desire to achieve the goal. Set a clear goal and work every day to achieve it. For example, to start, try to build a bankroll by playing in our daily freerolls.
 
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Murph1969

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It all depends on you and your desire to achieve the goal. Set a clear goal and work every day to achieve it. For example, to start, try to build a bankroll by playing in our daily freerolls.


I think that’s part of the problem. I can’t get excited about playing for tiny stakes.

I don't know what books you've read or what courses you've taken, but my suggestion would be to go through them again if you feel like you haven't learned anything. It's also important that you know how to apply what you've learned as that's part of the process. Learning/understanding is one thing, doing is another.

I don't know what questions you've asked but if you're getting 'it depends' responses, then you're probably asking very generic questions. Poker is a game of information, for detail replies, you need to provide as much detail to your question as you can get. If you want better replies, ask better questions.


I’m talking about basic things like when to 3bet, when to bluff after you miss the flop, when to check, how to keep track of position postflop, when to chase draws, what to do when you catch second or third pair, etc.
 
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VikyGia

VikyGia

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Opinion

hello, if you want to improve you just have to know which cards you should increase your bet to protect your pre flop cards. You must learn to control your emotions that often make us lose or make bad decisions.
You must know how to select your cards well, you should not see the flop or bet with any card since you are only looking for luck and do not really play.
Your level increases by playing tournaments.
 
eberetta1

eberetta1

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Everyone is different in their style of play. When I miss the flop, I still min raise to make my opponent pay to see the next card. If my opponent comes back at me with an all in, I will fold.


When chasing draws, I will not chase a straight if someone could be chasing a flush. I will not chase a flush, if someone can already be chasing a full house.


If a person raises when I have 2nd or 3rd pair, if it is a min raise, I may call. If it is an all in by my opponent, I will fold.

 
Aguimonteiro

Aguimonteiro

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I’m talking about basic things like when to 3bet, when to bluff after you miss the flop, when to check, how to keep track of position postflop, when to chase draws, what to do when you catch second or third pair, etc.




Part of this you will learn by practicing!
In addition to defining your open raising ranges well, 3 bet in each position!
Playing micros however much you don't like will help you put everything into practice without compromising your BR!

To determine the post flop moves it is important to have an idea of ​​how to calculate your equity x pot odds, this will end up defining whether that play is profitable in the long run or not (even if in that specific play you lost!).
 
mina271

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When you start playing poker, some people hope to make a career as a successful poker player very quickly, but to become a successful player you need a lot of time, a lot of patience and, above all, a lot of knowledge. Even then, only a few will make it to become a pro. Many questions cannot be answered clearly because it always depends on the situation. In which seat do I sit, how many people are in hand, how many chips do I and my opponents have. Do I play against aggressive players or rather passively. You can get advice but then there is still no guarantee that this will always work, as you know for sure AA is the best hand preflop there is but you can still lose with it.
 
mervin88

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if you feel like that maybe poker is not for you
 
milka1605

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This means that you did not carefully study the matter.
 
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1nsomn1a

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watch the game of other players. Many professionals play poker and explain their actions, learn from them, good luck:)
 
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Canwai

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I think game volume always helps. Play and your questions will match your studies.
 
Phoenix Wright

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I have no problems grinding freerolls or microstakes. Perhaps the bigger "issue" is why this doesn't sit comfortably for you. Of course it is more productive to move up in stakes when it is advantageous to do so, but playing lower stakes (nothing lower than freerolls :D ) shouldn't be a bother...poker is poker.

Perhaps the underlining problem is that you are imagining a "big score" or a similar poker mindset of a "big win" versus grinding over time. The long-term players all "grind" over months and years - not one day or one event.

Change the perspective this way: if you play well long-term, then long-term you'll be able to move up in stakes since the by-product of good long-term play will be a profit. This mindset seems more productive than pursuing chips/money because these are short-term considerations. One day shouldn't make or break a poker player...of course winning the wsop Main Event would probably "make" anyone :D
 
blueskies

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I feel like I’m at beginner level and can’t get any better. I’ve read books and taken numerous courses (including this one) and don’t feel like I’ve learned ANYTHING! There’s just information overload and it seems like the answer to every question is, “it depends.” Help me get better.

Position and notes on players.

You cannot play every player the same way. That's why "it depends" will apply in most situations.

No matter what, you are going to have to act on incomplete information. Your goal is to narrow your guess of your opponent's hand into as narrow a range as possible. You also should have a plan of how you will react on each street depending on opponent's action. You should always be thinking and asking yourself questions as the hand plays out.

Books and tips can only give you loose guidelines. The execution in real situations is still up to you.

And oh, by the way, even if you do everything perfectly on a hand, you can still lose because luck is the most important factor on any given hand. If I had a dollar for every time some donk makes a -EV call and beats me anyway, I'd be a millionaire.
 
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ROYALROAD

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It may be good to give up poker.

That is also a life.

However, if you think about it for about 3 days, you may find a solution ...
 
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CallmeFloppy

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I would break down your learning into smaller parts.

Instead of reading entire books or the entire course offered here, focus on one topic. Dig into in and ensure you have the concept down. Then, before you read more, play some poker, try to deploy the things you learned. Take some notes. Write down when those things you learned worked and when they didn't and why. Go back and re-read what you read to see if you applied them correctly. Make necessary adjustments and play again. Then you can move to the next topic.
 
black and

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I think that’s part of the problem. I can’t get excited about playing for tiny stakes.


But just the whole point is that you need to start small and move step by step to bigger goals. Just as a child cannot learn to walk if he cannot crawl. :)
 
Roller

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If your stuck or feel your stuck with no progress happening, maybe the answer lies in your hand history. Focus on studying and dissecting your hand histories, set a side a few hours a night to give all your attention your hand history.
 
ADRI7HO

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That's a pity.
Learning, practicing, and perhaps changing your mental attitude can help. If you haven’t found a gap in your game then you may want to look for the fault in the mental causes.
Good luck.
 
YenRodriguez

YenRodriguez

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Greetings brother, previously I felt that same sensation. and guess what?
the only way I've been able to learn is at the tables, taking hits and disappointments with every hand. But after that a little light, you learn which hands you should play in what kind of situations, you learn to match ranks based on how a tournament progresses, and you learn little by little at the tables. that's where I learned.
 
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mpkr10

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I would find a good coach. I went through several coaches, some were bad, some were just not right for me. I finally found a couple good coaches over a year ago and my skills have improved dramatically.
 
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