On The Flop Decisions

t1riel

t1riel

Legend
Here's another interesting article::hello:

[SIZE=+2]The Poker Gazette[/SIZE]News from the POKER GAZETTE
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Even with a good hand, keep an eye on the flop[FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]Most of the difficult decisions you'll face in a typical Texas Hold 'em hand will come after the flop.

It's easy enough to figure out what a good hand is before the flop and how you should play it, but many variables must be considered after the flop. Once those three community cards are dealt, many more possibilities exist.

Here are three particularly dangerous flops along with advice on how you should proceed.

• The paired flop — It can either be a really good discovery for you or the flop of death. Let's say you start with a pair of kings and the flop comes Qh-7s-7c. In this situation you have two pairs — kings and sevens.
If nobody has a 7 in their hand, you are in excellent shape (unless one of your opponents started with pocket queens or pocket aces). Because there are no draws on the board, it appears to be a pretty straightforward situation.

But what if someone raises you?

Your beautiful pair of kings might be up against a hand like A-Q. Or you could easily be drawing to one of only two kings left in the deck, if your opponent has the trip sevens.

The best way to approach a flop such as this with an overpair is to go ahead and bet. But if you encounter any resistance from an opponent, proceed with caution. Don't go crazy by raising and re-raising. Be content to just call the hand down and hope your opponent has a Q-Q rather than the dreaded three sevens.

• The coordinated flop — It is one where there is a three-card straight present, something like Q-10-8. Let's say you hold a pair of aces and there are three callers. A flop like that is extremely dangerous because it hits a range of cards with which your opponents might call. Hands like Q-J, Q-10, J-9, 8-8 are all cards your competitors might be holding.
While three out of the four hands have your aces beat (two pair, a straight, and three of a kind), even the first hand, Q-J, isn't far behind your aces. If a 9, J or Q arrives on the turn or river, he or she will beat you. Your aces are only a 2-1 favorite over the Q-J on that flop.

The more players that are in the pot, pre-flop, the more often a big pair ends up a loser. The goal is to try to narrow the field by raising aggressively on the flop and then, if the turn card is a bad one (8, 9, 10, J, Q, K), play cautiously, even if that means folding.

• The flushed flop — When the flop comes with three of the same suit, playing an overpair without holding one of the suit can be tricky. For this example, let's say you start with Jc-Js, and the flop is 8h-6h-2h. While you have a nice overpair, one more heart on the turn and your strong pocket jacks likely will be meaningless.
The best way to approach a hand like this is to bet the flop — but don't get too aggressive by raising. You could raise all you want on the flop, but if someone has a heart in their hand, chances are he's going to call you, anyway.

You need to understand that it's better to play cautiously on the flop, because there are still two cards to come. If a safe card comes on the turn, you might want to punish your opponent, who is drawing to a flush.

If there are several players in the pot, you might be better off folding right away on the flop. With six callers before the flop, there is a decent chance one of your opponents might hit their flush on the flop. If it's bet and raised in front of you, I would definitely suggest folding.
By Daniel Negreanu
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twizzybop

twizzybop

Legend
The goal is to try to narrow the field by raising aggressively on the flop and then, if the turn card is a bad one (8, 9, 10, J, Q, K), play cautiously, even if that means folding.

This should have been done pre-flop. Yes you want 1-2 callers tops with those KK's but that is about it. If you get everyone to fold it has also served its purpose. If you've raised aggresively pre-flop, you are definatly in good shape when the flop comes that if it does come.

Basically you don't want this to happen If there are several players in the pot, you might be better off folding right away on the flop.
 
gordo30

gordo30

Rock Star
yeh i would agree the aggressive play is a large bet pre flop to narrow the field,if any over cards come then raise the flop to see where exactly you stand.people underestimate the value of the raise it puts you in command of any hand at any point even with low pairs and normally pay,s dividends.
 
tenbob

tenbob

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Limping into a full table with a huge hand is nothing short of criminal, how many times ive seen players with AA or KK limp in, and then berate other players when they lose.

Played in a live game last night, shorthanded with huge blinds and i picked up QQ on the button. At this stage a 3XBB raise was all-in, so thats what i done. I came away with the blinds but a caller would have been fine. Now the BB figured that this was a donk play with queens. He figured i soulld have let him in to see a free flop and hope he gets a piece of it. So by calling, the likehood of the SB calling is high and the BB gets a free flop, and im playing QQ in a 3 way pot.

As it happened a few hands later when i was on the BB with K5o i caught a big piece of the flop when the same guy let me in free, with unraised aces. Only for him to whine about his bad luck in the game. (flop KK2 Turn K )
 
gordo30

gordo30

Rock Star
yeh tenbob that says it all pkt Qs is a good attacking hand but only if your heads up and your up against maybe one live card so bet away.Not sure if i,d go all in with it if the pot had been raised before you though, but knowing me i probably would but thats the gamble in poker sometimes you have to see all 5 cards.
 
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