Tournaments

H

helenag

Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2020
Total posts
63
Chips
0
How many tournaments would you play to no longer consider yourself a "new" poker player?
 
christmasscorpion

christmasscorpion

Rock Star
Joined
Feb 9, 2019
Total posts
406
Chips
0
in order not to consider yourself a beginner it is enough to play several thousand tournaments
to gain experience and knowledge to hone your skills and become a more experienced player
 
Last edited:
P

Paya_31

Visionary
Joined
Mar 7, 2018
Total posts
647
Chips
0
Hello friend, you have to play many hands to develop your game, once you understand it, you will find out when to advance to the next level. Taking into account the Bank roll, remember that to advance to the level you must improve your game as your money bank.
 
COMIRRR

COMIRRR

Legend
Joined
Jan 25, 2019
Total posts
1,465
Awards
1
RO
Chips
27
When you start spinning money without depositing then you may think you are no longer a beginner.
 
Newzooozooo

Newzooozooo

Legend
Loyaler
Joined
Apr 22, 2018
Total posts
2,226
Awards
1
UA
Chips
57
Hi.
Of course, this is an individual question and everything obviously depends only on you. But in general, I believe that a knowledgeable player has at least three or four years of experience.
 
sharipov8090

sharipov8090

Legend
Joined
Feb 6, 2019
Total posts
1,460
Chips
0
I feel like a rookie every day after another loss.Although I have already played a very large number of tournaments.So I find it difficult to answer this question.I use the sharkscope website to evaluate myself as a player.Try it and you to understand something.
 
Z

zerosalex

Visionary
Joined
Jun 22, 2020
Total posts
544
Awards
1
Chips
0
I think once you have a strategy to make it into the money and then into final tables often.
 
7

77ecos

Visionary
Joined
Aug 2, 2015
Total posts
748
Awards
2
Chips
47
That status is not important, the important thing is to generate money, achieve triumphs, and all that can come as a rookie, being in constant learning and improving your game will always be more important than any other status:jd4::jd4::jd4::jd4:
 
nuttea

nuttea

Visionary
Joined
Aug 3, 2013
Total posts
504
Awards
3
Chips
0
How many tournaments would you play to no longer consider yourself a "new" poker player?
The main challenge for beginners is finding the perfect balance of theory / practice. Beginners and often losing players are better off giving practice and theory the same amount of time. For seasoned grinders, the training time is calculated in a slightly different way - an hour of theory for ten hours of play. The more wins a player has, the less time he needs for lessons, but it is impossible to abandon theory at all - you can always find blank spots that need to be filled with knowledge.The time spent on learning and analyzing past games must be increased when a player wants to move up the limits. This in itself is risky, so you need a safety net in the form of repetition and learning new things. Very different predators live at high stakes, your old strategies may not work here. The grinder must study the contingent and systematically find an approach to each opponent, check the effectiveness of new methods of playing the game. At sky-high limits, there are no fish, all opponents know each other in an avatar and, accordingly, know what to expect from their colleagues. It's very difficult to fit in here.But an excellent knowledge of theory does not make a player a professional in poker, a beginner must constantly analyze the results of his game, keep notes on his opponents. For these purposes, it is recommended to create a separate notebook for notes, use the built-in features of poker rooms, or use specialized poker software,gl)
 
Alex70793

Alex70793

Visionary
Joined
Nov 18, 2018
Total posts
835
Awards
1
Chips
0
You can't just say that, you can't say one, three or ten tournaments, you can say a lot, a very lot.
I think this concept is for each player individually, it is something that is inside, it is difficult to explain, it is the internal state of the player.
 
P

pltelles

Visionary
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Total posts
503
Awards
1
BR
Chips
7
I think the results will tell you when you are no longer a beginner.
 
Austria7

Austria7

Rock Star
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Total posts
179
Chips
0
I don't think it's a question of how long or how many tournaments you've played. In my opinion it is a question of the attitude towards the game, the understanding of the game and also your own personality or your own playing style. You can play 5000 tournaments and learn nothing from the mistakes you made. You can also read poker books first and then start playing. And the actual game at the table is only one small jigsaw piece to success as a poker player. In fact, I think it's similar to golf ... you learn for a lifetime. :eek:
 
F

fundiver199

Legend
Loyaler
Joined
Jun 3, 2019
Total posts
11,269
Awards
1
Chips
19
If you can show an ROI of at least 10-20% over a large sample like 1.000 MTTs, and its not only due to a single big score, then you are no longer a beginner.
 
theANMATOR

theANMATOR

Legend
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Total posts
1,250
Awards
1
Chips
0
I just checked my shark scope - I have played over 8500 tournaments - I still consider myself a relative beginner to the game.

Half of those 8500 are ALL freeroll events.

I only started in February 2019.
 
Last edited:
Top