Tournament->Cash Game Adjustments

S

spr0ck3t

Rock Star
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Total posts
139
Apparently I started poker a little backwards, and started off studying MTTs/SnGs. As I was recently reminded (and whined about in a BBV thread), I'm not at the point where I'm doing better than break even at micro tournaments, but still the most fish fish to ever fish at 2nl.

What are some adjustments to start thinking about moving to cash games? Lower the aggression factor, be even more careful about position, bluff less, value bet bigger, what else?

Should I just start 'over' with some beginner's cash books?
 
3

300HPGOD

Legend
Joined
Feb 13, 2018
Total posts
1,180
Awards
10
First, you cant be the fishiest at 2 NL, that is reserved for me which is why I dont play cash too much these days anymore. My advice would be to intake as much cash game info as you can rather that come from books, videos, or even reading the cash game analysis posts on this forum. My strategy (take this for whats it worth cause I suck) is that cash games allow you to be more patient pre flop and then post flop is dictated more by math. Post flop bets should be a little larger in cash games than tournaments and players may actually call looser in cash than tournaments due to the fact they can reload. Again, this is a fish cash game player talking so hopefully others will jump in and correct me if needed and give you further advice.
 
R

ROYALROAD

Visionary
Joined
Jan 1, 2019
Total posts
601
Awards
1
A study of enemy's post flop bet in a cash game doesn't progress so much by a tournament.
 
Collin Moshman

Collin Moshman

Poker Expert
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Total posts
1,317
Awards
3
I think that adjustments like bluff less and value bet more don't generally apply moving from tournament to cash. It's not that you shouldn't be value betting a lot in cash games, just that I don't think you should be bluffing much more in low-stakes tournies relative to low-stakes cash.

I'd suggest focusing primarily on improving your deep-stacked and post-flop play since tournaments tend to play out at significantly shorter stacks (for the most part) than cash games. Mark and study hands from your games that have taken place at deeper stacks of 100bb. Work on getting better there.

Your tournament game will definitely still make you a better cash player and it's not like starting over as a new player :)
 
S

spr0ck3t

Rock Star
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Total posts
139
I think that adjustments like bluff less and value bet more don't generally apply moving from tournament to cash. It's not that you shouldn't be value betting a lot in cash games, just that I don't think you should be bluffing much more in low-stakes tournies relative to low-stakes cash.

I'd suggest focusing primarily on improving your deep-stacked and post-flop play since tournaments tend to play out at significantly shorter stacks (for the most part) than cash games. Mark and study hands from your games that have taken place at deeper stacks of 100bb. Work on getting better there.

Your tournament game will definitely still make you a better cash player and it's not like starting over as a new player :)


Lol well, bluffing too much at micro MTTs is almost definitely something I'm guilty of, so good note. Sometimes (a lot of times..) it's hard to tell if I'm being a maniac donk or "aggressive enough".

Would you say the early stages of deep stack tournaments (like 150bb+) are roughly analogous to cash, or do I need to play cash to practice cash?

Thanks!
 
zwbb

zwbb

Legend
Joined
Sep 2, 2017
Total posts
1,013
Awards
6
In a cash game, most of the hands are played between two or three players. Rarely are multi-pots for four or more poker players. Here the prize is received by one player, but according to the result of each distribution. That is, in order to win a hand, you most often need to beat only one opponent.
 
Collin Moshman

Collin Moshman

Poker Expert
Joined
Nov 11, 2009
Total posts
1,317
Awards
3
Lol well, bluffing too much at micro MTTs is almost definitely something I'm guilty of, so good note. Sometimes (a lot of times..) it's hard to tell if I'm being a maniac donk or "aggressive enough".

Would you say the early stages of deep stack tournaments (like 150bb+) are roughly analogous to cash, or do I need to play cash to practice cash?

Thanks!


Sorry for the delay replying. I made a post here that I'm not seeing so let me give this another shot!

The early stages of a tournament are definitely similar to cash. On hand #1 of a tourney with 150bb effective stacks, I would play almost the same whether it's cash or tourney (so long as I didn't know anything about my opponents). This would mean playing the same range unopened from the button, c-bet frequency, etc.

Of course, cash games will play out at different stacks than tournaments and if you know you want to improve at cash, then play cash. But your tourney experience will be very relevant and helpful to that :)
 
S

spr0ck3t

Rock Star
Joined
Nov 15, 2018
Total posts
139
Sorry for the delay replying. I made a post here that I'm not seeing so let me give this another shot!

The early stages of a tournament are definitely similar to cash. On hand #1 of a tourney with 150bb effective stacks, I would play almost the same whether it's cash or tourney (so long as I didn't know anything about my opponents). This would mean playing the same range unopened from the button, c-bet frequency, etc.

Of course, cash games will play out at different stacks than tournaments and if you know you want to improve at cash, then play cash. But your tourney experience will be very relevant and helpful to that :)



Thanks! Early stages/deep in tournaments are where I'm weakest I think, so it sounds like playing more (some...) cash might actually help my MTT game too.
 
Vallet

Vallet

Legend
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Total posts
1,785
Awards
12
Cash game implies a more relaxed game. You don't have to go up the stairs forever and watch the blinds go up. Leave the table immediately when you feel tired. Less risk is the basic principle.
If you see an opponent pushing, it means one of two options.
1 He is tired of playing. 2 He has nuts.
 
Real Money Poker - Real Money Casinos Top 10 Games
Top