Open-ended straight draws

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theresets

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As of right now i play these hands a lot like flush draws because they have a pretty close number of outs but it feels like they never get there. How should i be playing these types of hands?
 
supernuts25

supernuts25

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there actually not same outs flush draws you have 13 outs. and open ended you have 8 outs.

i try not too chase if its to expensive it will cost you more in long run. try to stick around if it costs u minimal, or if the pot odds are there but be careful its not a high percentage to hit.
 
pistolpetewags11

pistolpetewags11

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flush draw after flop is 9 outs, 2 on board 2 in hand less 13. open ender is 8 outs like u mentioned.
 
S

Streethawk71

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Can anyone tell me if I correct in saying that you should only be getting into this position if the P.O. are favourable - this usually needed 3 players to see the flop?
Someone needs to scare off the third hand after the flop, otherwise you're most likely a serious dog.
If you can bet and win after the flop, you might not build the pot as much, but a small win with a draw is still a win and as you didn't have to showdown your opponents don't know whether you were there or not which keeps you in play for other hands. The size of this bet is crucial and you need to understand what odds you are offering your opponent. If you offer low odds and they keep coming, don't be surprised if they raise you later and you have to make a tricky decision.
Finally, keep one eye on the P.O. and the other on what hands the community cards might make for the other players. You need to judge whether their bets make sense in both the context of the specific hand and in the context of their general betting pattern.
 
detroitjunkie

detroitjunkie

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one thing to always consider when thinking about odds...odds only count if you are playing enough games to break even or better with them - ex: you are in a hand where you are a 10-1 dog, but the pot odds are 11-1 so you call, if you do not play enough or have the bankroll to be in this exact situation 10 times then you may want to rethink your position

yes OE straight draws are about 2% less likely to hit than a flush draw when turned (which is something I love about the math since straights are more likely preflop), but it is close...either way you are only hitting it 1 in 6 times and with stats models you may not hit it for a long long time so be prepared to spend a lot attempting to hit these
 
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Nutcracker69

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You have to factor in implied odds, too. If you have 69 and 78 on board, sure, you might be able to get paid with the 5 or the 10. Problem is, only 1 gives you nuts, the other loses to 9J. If you have, on the other hand 78 with 56 on board, your implied odds are EVEN WORSE because it is FAR EASIER to let it go to 3 in a row if the 4 falls, which gives you the nuts. Luckily for you the 9 also gives you nuts and you should be able to get something for it.

That's why TRUE implied odds on softer draws like inside straight draws are higher because you get to jam with high likelihood when it comes through, plus at least the loser (if not the whole table) will call you a donkey (which you are, let's keep it real) and play you very loose. This works out to my advantage plenty of times until my kq on king high board is called by 44 on the turn and 4 comes on the river. ::shakes head::
 
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Broon1234

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9 outs vs 8 outs but think about overcards too. they will only complete about 25% of the time so consider pot odds and implied odds
 
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satirist

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I really hate playing these hands- the false air of strength always makes me vulnerable in the long term. I win with air and lose with decent hands, my problem is perhaps that I'm too consistent (bluffing and playing with strength) overall with these types of hands (I would almost put AJ in this category, almost...) These are the types of pre-flop cards that heartbreaks are made of.
 
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Nutcracker69

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I really hate playing these hands- the false air of strength always makes me vulnerable in the long term. I win with air and lose with decent hands, my problem is perhaps that I'm too consistent (bluffing and playing with strength) overall with these types of hands (I would almost put AJ in this category, almost...) These are the types of pre-flop cards that heartbreaks are made of.

You are playing a weird game that gives you an open ended straight draw preflop. I'm not sure how I'd do in such a game.
 
K

kevinmarkus

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I've had great success with flopping open ended straight draws. I play aggressive to scare the low pairs off the board. Typically it works well! It probably wouldn't work too well against highly experienced players, but I have fun donking around.. ;)
 
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Sidetracked

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Flush draws have 9 outs, open ended straight draws have 8 outs.

OESD is potentially a strong draw, but be aware of possibly contaminated outs (be careful of OESDs on 2 flush boards...you may only have 6 clean outs if someone is on a FD)
 
P

Poker247

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Flush draw has 9 outs, so slightly more likely to hit. Also you need to take into account board texture and implied odds based on what you think your opponent is holding when figuring out whether to call a bet on a draw. If the pot odds give you the right price after taking these factors into consideration, then it is to your benefit to call (mathematically speaking).
 
J

jerohit

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Only play if you can chase them cheaply.. otherwise just fold..
 
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