Bankroll management

Z

zerosalex

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Any important tips you guys have when it comes to bankroll management? like simple ones or important ones when it comes to the subject?

Thanks in advance.
 
Q

Qrise

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if there is not enough money on the account then micro tournaments MTT knockouts help me
 
J

Jack2020

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As I found out, Your tourney buy in should be at max. 1% or 2% of your total bank roll.
 
C

COMIRRR

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Here everything depends on the person of each one, you can have a lot of money in your account but if you are not a realistic and responsible person you will lose everything
 
U

Ultfrozen

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Previously, I often went to expensive tournaments not on the Bank roll, in them you often play too tight and any cooler and you flew out of the tournament and have to make a Deposit again, so it's better to play not expensive but a lot until you accumulate a good Bank roll
 
Juan Oro

Juan Oro

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It will always depend on the mode that you play cash or tournaments, if it is cash you should have a bankroll of 100 entries, chip boxes, example if you play in NL 2 a minimum bank of $ 100 NL 5 = $ 500 NL 10 = $ 1000 you always have to have a bankroll to play a large number of hand volumes and see the results at the end of the month and all is DISCIPLINE. If they are sit & go tournaments you can start with 50 tickets depending on the level you are going to play and you build your bankroll a little stronger to put more volume of play. If they are open mtts tournaments you must have a more solid bankroll of about 200 entries since the variance is much stronger because many players play but you will always control everything with a lot of DISCIPLINE.
 
R

ROYALROAD

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When it's scarce in the bank roll.
It'll gain by the free roll.
 
florestaftw

florestaftw

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As I found out, Your tourney buy in should be at max. 1% or 2% of your total bank roll.



The important thing is to establish a limit, and a percentage of play.
entries must not exceed 2% of your bankroll
 
D

DevaCat

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The single most important thing is to be a profitable player. If you're not profitable, good bankroll management is only going to make sure that you go bust slowly rather than quickly. And as the easiest stakes to win at are the lowest, you have to ensure that you can make profits over an extended period at the lowest levels- NL2, $1 buy in tournaments.

So before you go anywhere else, or move up stakes, play at least 10k NL2 hands, and a lot more if you're not crushing it (>10bb/ 100, which is completely doable); or a large number of tournaments (not really my thing, but I understand that you need something like 1k tourneys for results to become reasonably accurate). Note that freerolls don't count towards the 1k- this is a thousand $1 buy in STTs/ MTTs.

Only once you're sure you can beat the lowest stakes, and heavily, move up. If you're winning at 2bb/100 at NL2 and move up to NL5, you're likely to be ground down, even if you have the usual 30+ buy-ins. The standard goes up at every level. A losing NL2 player "taking a shot" at NL5 or, even worse, NL10 will be obliterated.

The number of posts on this forum from players who haven't done this is astonishing- players with a $20 bankroll who get frustrated by being called down at NL2 and think they'll win if players "respect their raises" blow it in a single session of NL5. SMH.
 
F

fundiver199

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The single most important thing is to be a profitable player. If you're not profitable, good bankroll management is only going to make sure that you go bust slowly rather than quickly. And as the easiest stakes to win at are the lowest, you have to ensure that you can make profits over an extended period at the lowest levels- NL2, $1 buy in tournaments.

So before you go anywhere else, or move up stakes, play at least 10k NL2 hands, and a lot more if you're not crushing it (>10bb/ 100, which is completely doable); or a large number of tournaments (not really my thing, but I understand that you need something like 1k tourneys for results to become reasonably accurate). Note that freerolls don't count towards the 1k- this is a thousand $1 buy in STTs/ MTTs.

Only once you're sure you can beat the lowest stakes, and heavily, move up. If you're winning at 2bb/100 at NL2 and move up to NL5, you're likely to be ground down, even if you have the usual 30+ buy-ins. The standard goes up at every level. A losing NL2 player "taking a shot" at NL5 or, even worse, NL10 will be obliterated.

The number of posts on this forum from players who haven't done this is astonishing- players with a $20 bankroll who get frustrated by being called down at NL2 and think they'll win if players "respect their raises" blow it in a single session of NL5. SMH.


It cant be said much better than this. Just want to add, that the point about being a winning player also applies when trying to move up. Just because you beat a certain limit does not mean, you are automatically going to beat the next. So you need to be ready to throw in the towel and move back down, before your entire bankroll is gone. For more specific advice I would need to know, what kind of games you are playing.
 
A

alien666dj

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I can advise you to look at Chris Ferguson's bankroll management rules.
After that, you should play 400+ tournaments and analyze your game in specialized programs to understand what, where and when you are doing wrong. As a result, you will know what to work on and to what level you can rise.
Over time, with a set of 10,000+ hands, you can take training from a more successful player.
 
Bankroll Building - Bankroll Management
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