Ashley Adams points out why good poker players can't move up

Vallet

Vallet

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I liked the article. I can set aside part 5 especially for myself.
 
gupiel0k69

gupiel0k69

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Thanks Shells, good article.

Guess i will find that poker strategy book i threw into the corner 'cause i was too good in the past...
 
Raphael Zabel

Raphael Zabel

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Great article. Good tips to self-analyze where we are and where we want to go.
 
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pcurley17

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great article, have taken some notes, should improve my game
 
Phoenix Wright

Phoenix Wright

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Interesting article, but I don't think I fall into any of these 5 mistakes. Maybe one day I can take the leap out of my small live homegames and online freerolls and "level up" to the smallest of micro stakes :D
 
Pokerpoet2

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I recognise a lot about myself in this article and understand the situations well, but I think there is another Major problem with moving up in Stakes.
Somehow and for no apparent reason, the games change, at least that's what we tell ourselves, but in fact it is not the game that changes but our attitude towards the game that changes, when we are playing for a small buy-in and then suddenly decide to move up in stakes the main thought in the back of everyone's mind is focused on what we might lose.
I am guilty of this more than most, but the problem is, even though I know what is happening I cannot lose the thought that I may be biting off more than I can chew.
Am I playing against better Players? Am I trying to go up in stakes too early? These and many other thoughts seem to block the ability to play as well as I do in lower stakes.
I would be interested if anyone else feels the same way and how to achieve a better mind-set?

When the fun Stops, STOP!
 
SpanRmonka

SpanRmonka

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Thanks for sharing this. very thought provoking. 2,3 and 5 are areas I can def take something from. I often find when I'm learing something new or am trying to focus on improving an area of my game, that my game suffers in the short term. It really is due to trying to improve something too much, rather than being patient to apply the improvements only in the right spots.
This is a very difficult balancing act.

The cardchat games have been tough so far, it seems as soon as I make an adjustment, I'm re adjusted on very quickly. Perhaps my play is sometimes too habitual too. Lots to consider. Cheers :smile:
 
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JeffSBrito

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I know I need to improve my game. I already did some FT's and also won micro tournaments. I mostly agree with mistake 3. I often think I know something, but deep down. I don't know almost anything yet. Thanks for sharing that knowledge. It makes me think a little about how to improve.
 
Luca Santos

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I think that every player is in this article, some more others less but we are all here.
 
Shells

Shells

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I recognise a lot about myself in this article and understand the situations well, but I think there is another Major problem with moving up in Stakes.
Somehow and for no apparent reason, the games change, at least that's what we tell ourselves, but in fact it is not the game that changes but our attitude towards the game that changes, when we are playing for a small buy-in and then suddenly decide to move up in stakes the main thought in the back of everyone's mind is focused on what we might lose.
I am guilty of this more than most, but the problem is, even though I know what is happening I cannot lose the thought that I may be biting off more than I can chew.
Am I playing against better Players? Am I trying to go up in stakes too early? These and many other thoughts seem to block the ability to play as well as I do in lower stakes.
I would be interested if anyone else feels the same way and how to achieve a better mind-set?

When the fun Stops, STOP!

You make some very interesting and good points here...Moving up in stakes does seem to develop a different attitude. We often believe that all poker players who move up in stakes or often play higher stakes are just naturally better players...THAT is not always the case. (but it can make us get into our own head)

I believe confidence and a true understanding of the game you are playing go a long way. Confidence is not the same as 'overconfidence' either ...use the skills you have developed, play to win and hope you continue to learn from losses (and wins).
 
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Akena

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Totally agree with this article. I found some of my mistakes in it! But it's a good thing because we can only improve !!! ;)
 
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pltelles

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Great article! It serves to show us that we can always improve, and that we must be in constant construction and evolution.
 
Claudiunm

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Very good article. I will try to read it often. I have many flaws that I can improve by applying these principles.
 
NWPatriot

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A valuable learning concept is the Advanced Learning Model (ALM). This is a great method to interpret what we know and what we don’t know. The model defines the 4 stages of learning a skill:
1. Unconscious incompetence – this is prior to learning anything at all about a skill. You don’t even know what you don’t know. You may not even have known that this was a skill.
2. Conscious incompetence – you now know what you don’t know (to some degree), but you are still incompetent at applying this skill.
3. Conscious competence – you are competent at applying this new skill, but you have to think about it do so.
4. Unconscious competence – you are now an expert at this skill and you can apply the knowledge with very little effort. You do not need to think about it in order to apply it. This can likely only happen with experience and repetition. You are an expert.
The best analogy or example for applying this model to a common skill is driving a car. Level 1 is the child who has no idea what is really involved in driving a car. Level 2 is the teenager taking driver’s education. He now realizes what he doesn’t know and how difficult it can be. Level 3 is the young adult who has passed the tests and has his license. He has knowledge, but no experience. He still has not seen all the difficult situations that might arise, but he is capable. Level 4 is the adult who has been driving for many years and is very comfortable behind the wheel. Not much thought is required for this person to drive from here to there, until he begins driving in an unfamiliar area, in which case he becomes a level 3 learner again, due to the introduction of a new variable.


Very similar to poker. We can be at level 3 or 4 in our most familiar games. But when we change stakes, play a tougher crowd, or change some other key element, we automatically drop from being at level 3 or 4 to now being at level 2 or 3. That is just the way it is. We have new things to learn and adjust to, until we can now play at the the expert level again.


Good luck and God bless.
 
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StreetPhd

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This was a great article.
I think I'm going to order his latest book.
Thanks for posting it.
 
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