WSOP Day 47: Newhouse Looks for 2nd November Nine Spot

Mark Newhouse could make a second November Nine showing, which would be two years running at the WSOP Main Event.

Mark Newhouse (shown here at last year’s WSOP Final Table, front row, far left) is aiming for back-to-back November Nine final tables. (Image: WSOP)

The 2014 World Series of Poker Main Event is nearing its end with only two more days of play on tap before the November Nine is determined. With just 79 players still in contention, play is getting intense for the competitors as well as poker fans.

The chip leader going into Day 6 is none other than Mark Newhouse. The longtime poker player known to some as “Newhizzle” just made the November Nine last year. He finished in ninth place for $733,224. Now, he looks to become the first player to make the coveted final table twice, but nothing looks sweeter than the $10 million awaiting the ultimate winner this year.

Payouts for those exiting the field today are substantial and increase every few spots. The possibilities for today’s finishers are:

73rd – 81st places: $85,812
64th – 72nd places: $103,025
55th – 63rd places: $124,447
46th – 54th places: $152,025
37th – 45th places: $186,388
28th – 36th places: $230,487
19th – 27th places: $286,900
16th – 18th places: $347,521
13th – 15th places: $441,940
10th – 12th places: $565,193

We’ll bring updates to you tomorrow morning to recap all of today’s action.

Event 65: $10K NLHE World Championship Main Event (Day 5 of 7)

It’s important to note that when the 2014 WSOP Main Event began on July 5-7, the three starting days produced the fifth-largest field for this event in its 45-year history. These were the resulting numbers:

Entries: 6,683
Prize pool: $62,820,200
Place paid: 693
First place prize: $10,000,000

Day 4 thinned the field tremendously, from 746 players, into the money, and down to just 291 players. They returned on Day 5 and played rather quickly to reduce the number of tables much further.

Phillip Lowery was the first player to exit on Saturday, taking home $33,734 for the 291st place finish. Former chip leader Tim Stansifer left soon after in 289th place for the same amount. Other notables who departed throughout the day included:

286th place: Mike Sowers ($38,634)
272nd place: John Monnette ($38,634)
265th place: Tony Ma ($38,634)
242nd place: Kevin MacPhee ($38,634)
238th place: Farzad Bonyadi ($38,634) – last year’s bubble player, won a free 2014 seat
226th place: Mark Herm ($38,634)

At the next payout level, some of the departures were:

200th place: Mike Wattel ($44,728)
197th place: Jesper Hougaard ($44,728)
188th place: Jeff Madsen ($44,728)
179th place: John Kabbaj ($44,728)
174th place: Rep Porter ($44,728)
173rd place: David Einhorn ($44,728)
170th place: Brian Townsend ($44,728)

Some of the eliminations during the next payout level were:

140th place: Alex Outhred ($52,141)
132nd place: Peter Neff ($52,141)
101st place: Mukul Pahuja ($52,141)

Subsequent pay jumps were quick to roll out, and these players cashed out:

93rd place: Emil Olsson ($61,313)
90th place: Griffin Benger ($61,313)
83rd place: Mikiyo Aoki ($72,369)
81st place: Ali Eslami ($85,812)

Play stopped late into the night with 79 players bagging their chips. The shortest stack of them all is Maria Ho, the last woman in the tournament and no stranger to deep WSOP runs. Other names in the lower half of the chip counts include Kyle Bowker, David Tuthill, Vitaly Lunkin, Chanracy Khun, and Brian Roberts.

On the upper half of the chip counts, players like Eddy Sabat, Brian Hastings, Matt Waxman, Ryan Fair, Bryan Devonshire, and Martin Jacobson possess strong stacks.

As for the top 10, they are listed as follows:

1. Mark Newhouse (7,400,000)
2. Kyle Keranen (6,670,000)
3. Scott Palmer (6,595,000)
4. Bruno Politano (5,475,000)
5. Andoni Larrabe (5,470,000)
6. Dan Smith (5,360,000)
7. Dan Sindelar (5,240,000)
8. Tony Ruberto (5,235,000)
9. Iaren Lightbourne (4,975,000)
10. Leif Force (4,745,000)

Play will move forward again today, eliminating the majority of players and bringing just a couple dozen back for the last day of play tomorrow.

Jennifer Newell
Written by
Jennifer Newell
Jennifer Newell has been writing about the poker industry for nearly eight years. She became interested in writing about the game and its players while working in the accounting department at the World Poker Tour in Los Angeles. Since then, she quit the office job, became a freelance writer, and moved to Las Vegas. She is also working on several crime novels, enjoys cooking, and talks way too much about her two dogs.

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