Tag Team Poker App Makes Poker a Team Sport

February 22nd, 2015 by Devin O'Connor
Tag Team Poker app

A new app called Tag Team Poker lets users compete in teams of two, colluding to take down other duos at the table. (Image: youtube.com)

Tag Team Poker is hoping its new app will appeal to a larger audience through an original format that makes poker a team game.

As you probably expect, the app puts players in two-person teams to compete against other duos.

Players can connect with their friends through Facebook and Google Plus, or find a random partner through the game itself.

Both teammates have an individual hand to play, but they share one bankroll. With each team essentially being dealt four cards per hand, there are more ways to win, and lose.

While serious poker grinders aren’t likely to be turned on by Tag Team Poker, the format should fill a purpose in attracting novice players to the game.

Part of the problem with bringing new persons to the felt is the game’s natural intimidation. Sitting down with a bunch of strangers, some with glasses on and others who don’t say a word can be downright terrifying!

Imagine how many more people would try poker if they could essentially be seated next to a friend who helps them decide their move and strategy. The app’s instructional configuration, ease of play, Android and iOS availability, and overall design should bring a new pool of players to poker, which is only a good thing.

Less Risk, Less Reward

At its core, the app is essentially a way for novices to learn No-Limit Hold’em. The format combines real-time play and teaches users how reap the benefits of a good hand, how to bluff, and when to fold. “Are you good enough to play with a partner and hustle your opponents?

Split winnings with your teammate and strategize to outfox other teams,” the app description reads. Although collusion is a prohibited scheme at poker tables, the practice is encouraged in Tag Team Poker, with partners working together for their overall good. Of course, a co-op format means less risk and exposure for each individual player, but also less reward.

While the game is Texas NLHE, strategy is somewhat similar to that of Pot Limit Omaha. Since teams are essentially dealt four cards, players are attempting to create their single best hand, and if they deem it strong enough, betting up the pot with the other. Another twist in the format is that players seated at the table don’t know who is one whose side, making the ambiguous nature perfect for raising the pot.

Real Money Games?

Following the rapid popularity growth of alternative poker formats such as Spin & Go tournaments and fast-fold events, it’s not unreasonable to think this new twist on the team game could gain traction. It’s really quite surprising that one of the larger online networks such as PokerStars or 888poker hasn’t already created a group play format.

However, for Tag Team Poker to ultimately become an accepted configuration among poker enthusiasts, the app will have to transition into offering real money games. That undoubtedly creates a plethora of concerns for Tag Team Games, a young start-up headquartered in Canada, but the conception seems like a perfect fit for online play.

Should it venture into cash events, the app would appeal to countless players from casual beginners all the way up to seasoned pros.

3 Responses to “Tag Team Poker App Makes Poker a Team Sport”

  1. nevadanick says:

    If someone wants to play ‘team’ card games, try pinochle or bridge.

    Card rooms, forums and players spend small fortunes trying to prevent collusion, now some want to make it part of poker … sheesh …

  2. woohoo sue says:

    yup we do this in our private forum niche is one thing…..to create a training ground for collusion is absurd…..I’m sure its very entertaining but poker is a game with serious monetary consequences that is protected by tried and true rules….let’s not propagate bad behavior in an official poker site setting. Leave this crazy game in game rooms along with candy crush.

  3. CallmeFloppy says:

    I agree that this leads to more players thinking collusion, which this promotes, as an acceptable thing. I hold regular games and on occasion have done a tag team type of setting. We have two players to a “team” that sub out each time the blinds are raised. Therefore we still have 1 player, 1 hand, 1 bankroll. The active player is not allowed to discuss their hand with their partner during play.

Leave a Comment