Poker Player Justin Lapka Accused of Starting WSOP Circuit Event with ‘Too Many Chips’

Poker player Shawn Daniels accused Justin Lapka on Twitter of starting WSOP Circuit Event #5 ($600 No-Limit Hold’em Double Stack) at Planet Hollywood in Las Vegas with an over-sized chip stack.

poker player justin lapka

Poker player Shawn Daniels alleges that Justin Lapka knowingly started a WSOP Circuit event with more chips than everyone else. (Image: businessinsider.com)

The accuser claims his opponent who late registered began with an extra 5,000 chips on Day One. Based on Daniels’ Twitter posts, it appears “Lappy” wasn’t at fault for receiving too many chips. But he also said Justin refused to return the excess chips.

Players in the $600 buy-in event started with 40,000 chips. Well, most of them did. Apparently, one player got even more. However, the dealer eventually took the extra 5,000 chips off his stack.

Poker Player Calls Out Peer

Shawn Daniels went on Twitter to publicly out Justin Lapka for “scumming.” That’s become standard procedure for poker drama.

https://twitter.com/STaNobv/status/1065025839912251394

Steven Snyder, another poker player, responded to the Tweet with an insult to the alleged “cheater.” He said, “He has to be the biggest douche I’ve ever met at the tables.”

“Constantly talking sh*t when he loses a pot and just always unhappy making smart ass comments to everyone. He thinks he’s some hot shot player,” Snyder continued.

Lapka has $42,000 in live tournament winnings but has been a successful online player. He finished fifth in a $1,000 WSOP Online Bracelet event this past summer ($65,000).

Daniels continued criticizing his opponent throughout Tuesday’s Day One session.

https://twitter.com/STaNobv/status/1065073006752350208

Justin Lapka Apologizes

Lapka has a reputation to uphold being a Twitch streamer. So, he couldn’t just ignore the public bashing. Instead, he posted a formal apology on Twitter.

“I just wanna acknowledge that I made a decision tonight without a full understanding of how my decisions may affect other people or the poker community at-large,” he wrote.

In his apology, Lapka admitted he noticed he had an extra 5,000 chips when he got to his seat. At first, he said, he “made excuses as to why it would be okay to stay put.”

But he now acknowledges that he “wasn’t taking responsibility” for his actions and referred to his behavior as “inherently wrong.”

At first, Lapka took a “bank error in your favor” mindset. But, after the fact, he says he now realizes he was “wrong” to think that way. The poker player claims he always does right to those who have been wronged.

Lapka apologized to the poker community and “anyone who believes in me as a person.”

“I promise though I will do my best to make this up to you,” he wrote.

Written by
Jon Sofen
Semi-pro poker player with 17 years experience on the felt and more than five years working as professional poker media.

Comments

8bod8 wrote...

Typical false accusation. Lappy didn’t do anything wrong.
Jealous crybaby daniels keeps on puking ‘disrespectfuly’.
Clearly daniels is not one of the best players, at least character wise.

hermaeris wrote...

Well, 8bod8, did you even bother to read the article? Lapka did, admitted it in the end and apaologized. What more prove do you need?
By the way, I found the title and especially subtitle misleading. The interesting fact here isn’t that Lapka was accused or who accused him but that he cheated.

mtl mile end wrote...

It never ceases to amaze me what a lot of people (I’m taking vast majority) can rationalize in their head as acceptable. Even when those actions, looked at objectively, would be condemned by virtually everyone (including those who could rationalize it for themselves). This is just another example of how fundamentally selfish people really are. They were “in the moment”, they were “hyper focused”, they “lost perspective”, or, to be clear, they cheated, they did so willingly.

If the person handing you a stack to start a tourney makes a mistake and gives you too many chips, you tell someone and correct the problem. You count your starting stack to make sure it’s correct, not to make sure you received “at least” a starting stack.

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