Nevada Sportsbooks May Soon Accept Out-of-State Wagers

October 17th, 2018 by Jon Sofen

Nevada sportsbooks appear to be on the verge of accepting bets from other states where sports betting is legal, with approval for such a leap pending in front of the state Gaming Control Board.

Nevada sportsbooks

Bellagio in Las Vegas is home to one of the top Nevada sportsbooks. (Image: thevegasparlay.com)

Earlier this year, the US Supreme Court determined each state should have the right to legalize sports betting. As a result of the ruling, sportsbooks in Nevada became feared their revenues would decline.

So, to help ease those concerns, the GCB is considering the possibility of allowing out-of-state wagers. It wouldn’t be the first time Nevada’s gaming regulators approved a similar measure.

Better Results than Online Poker?

Earlier this year, the Silver State granted its legal poker site, WSOP.com, permission to merge its player pool with New Jersey and Delaware. However, despite the shared liquidity agreement, none of the states involved have benefited much financially.

On Tuesday, the gaming board heard testimony from 10 industry representatives. The hearing addressed four gambling related issues, including accepting sports wagers from out-of-state bettors.

If the measure is approved, sportsbooks will be permitted to accept wagers from customers in other states that have legalized sports betting.

New Mexico became the sixth state to open a legal sportsbook, joining Nevada, New Jersey, Delaware, West Virginia, and Mississippi.

Prior to the Supreme Court ruling earlier this year, only Nevada had licensed sportsbooks in operation. The US’s highest court overturned the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992, a law that prevented all but four states from accepting sports wagers.

Some felt the ruling may harm Las Vegas’ sportsbooks. But the Gaming Control Board appears willing to help.

Nevada Sports Betting Upgrades

The Gaming Control board is also considering two other changes to its sports betting regulations. First of all, the issue of player security was addressed.

Providing a full social security number is a requirement when using a mobile sports betting app. That rule might soon end. Gaming regulators may amend that law to only require a player submit the last four digits of his or her social security number.

The final issue on the docket at Tuesday’s hearing is geared towards tourists. At present, sportsbooks are only required to give winning ticket holders 30 days to cash in their ticket. That is often a problem for non-locals who won futures bets or forgot to cash in a winning ticket before leaving town.

In the future, assuming the Gaming Control Board approves the measure, gamblers will have a full year to get their money. That will give them more time to come back if they live in, say, Paducah, Kentucky, which is 1,700 miles from Las Vegas.

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